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Defense and National Security News


  • Past Washington Times articles from 2002 to 2009

    Veteran China hand Lilley dies
    November 15, 2009
    James R. Lilley, whose six-decade government career included serving as U.S. ambassador to China during the tumult of the 1989 Beijing democracy protests and military crackdown, died Nov. 12. He was 81.

    U.S. ignored warnings before deadly Afghan attack
    October 16, 2009
    Three intelligence reports warned that Taliban insurgents were planning an attack just days before this month's raid on two remote military outposts in eastern Afghanistan that killed eight U.S. soldiers, but the reports were dismissed as insignificant, U.S. officials told The Washington Times.

    National security adviser says Iran building medium-range missiles
    September 19, 2009
    White House National Security Adviser James L. Jones says President Obama's decision to abandon a long-range missile defense site in Eastern Europe was driven by U.S. intelligence concerns that Iran is further along than previously thought in developing medium-range missiles that could strike Western Europe and the Middle East with nuclear warheads.

    Pro-Israel lobby probe linked to anti-Semitism
    July 30, 2009
    A long-running FBI espionage probe of the pro-Israel lobby in Washington appears to have been motivated in part by anti-Semitism, says a former Pentagon official who revealed this week he had cooperated for 10 weeks with federal agents conducting the probe.

    Defense analyst in spy case was FBI double agent
    July 29, 2009
    Larry Franklin, the former Pentagon analyst convicted of revealing classified information, says he worked undercover as an FBI double agent to gather information on the pro-Israel lobby in the United States before the bureau turned on him and pressured him to plead guilty to spying for Israel.

    Americans held in Iraq: FBI violated rights
    July 20, 2009
    For more than a month, two U.S. citizens who worked for contractors in Iraq were held in prison with no formal charges against them.

    Space-defense systems secure in glass house
    July 6, 2009
    COLORADO SPRINGS -- The transfer of strategic North American aerospace defense systems from inside the hardened complex of Colorado's Cheyenne Mountain to the basement of a glass office building has not reduced the security of the system, the commander of the U.S. Northern Command says.

    U.S. 'ready' for N. Korean missile
    July 2, 2009
    COLORADO SPRINGS -- U.S. missile defenses are prepared to try to knock down the last stage of a Taepodong-2 missile that North Korea is expected soon to launch if sensors detect the weapon threatens U.S. territory, the commander of the U.S. Northern Command told The Washington Times.

    Obama's missed opportunity in Egypt
    June 11, 2009
    The White House views the speech in Cairo by President Obama reaching out to Muslims as part of its aggressive effort to counter the lies of Muslim extremists while promoting American values around the world. Specialists in international public diplomacy, however, said the president missed a chance to launch a much-needed program to more directly critique the roots of Muslim extremism and counter its ideology of hate with a war of ideas.

    N. Korea general tied to forged $100 bills
    June 02, 2009
    A North Korean general who is a confidant of the country's leader, Kim Jong-il, has been identified by U.S. and foreign intelligence agencies as a key figure in the covert production and distribution of high-quality counterfeit $100 bills called supernotes, according to documents and interviews with intelligence officials.

    Defense staffer charged in China spy case
    May 14, 2009
    A civilian employee of the Defense Department was arrested Wednesday on espionage charges that he sold classified information and passed other sensitive documents to a spy for the Chinese government who has been convicted of compromising another Pentagon employee.

    China blocks U.S. from cyberwarfare
    May 12, 2009
    China has developed more secure operating software for its tens of millions of computers and is already installing it on government and military systems, hoping to make Beijing's networks impenetrable to U.S. military and intelligence agencies.

    Afghan commander's aide blames deaths on Taliban
    May 12, 2009
    A top aide defended Gen. David McKiernan after his dismissal as Afghanistan theater commander Monday, saying many of the civilians who died in U.S. air strikes last week had been forced into target buildings by the Taliban and required to shoot at government forces.

    Obama OK'd 2 SEAL teams for pirates
    April 22, 2009
    President Obama dispatched two separate teams of Navy commandos to carry out last week's rescue of a merchant ship captain held hostage by Somali pirates but left the operational details and rules of engagement to military commanders, National Security Adviser James. L. Jones said Tuesday.

    U.S. failed to use best radar for N. Korea missile
    April 15, 2009
    Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates denied permission for the U.S. Northern Command to use the Pentagon's most powerful sea-based radar to monitor North Korea's recent missile launch, precluding officials from collecting finely detailed launch data or testing the radar in a real-time crisis, current and former defense officials said.

    Pentagon: Beijing boosts cyberwarfare
    March 26, 2009
    China is continuing a large-scale military buildup of high-tech forces that includes "disruptive" anti-satellite missiles, new strategic forces, and computer attack weapons, the Pentagon's annual report to Congress on the Chinese military says.

    Chinese spy who defected tells all
    March 19, 2009
    A veteran Chinese intelligence officer who defected to the United States says that his country's civilian spy service spends most of its time trying to steal secrets overseas but also works to bolster Beijing's Communist Party rule by repressing religious and political dissent internally.

    Commerce pick tied to China cash
    March 18, 2009
    Commerce Secretary nominee Gary Locke, whose job would include approving sensitive exports to China, has performed legal work for companies doing business with Beijing and was forced to refund several political donations that he received in the 1990s from key figures in a Chinese influence-buying investigation.

    U.S. protests China's ship harassment
    March 11, 2009
    Director of National Intelligence Dennis C. Blair told a Senate hearing Tuesday that China's military is increasing harassment of U.S. Navy survey ships, activities viewed by U.S. intelligence as the most aggressive since 2001, when a Chinese jet flew into a U.S. EP-3 surveillance plane and set off an international crisis.

    Spy agency focus of shakeup
    February 19, 2009
    Two senior U.S. counterintelligence officials have left positions inside the agency that coordinates America's efforts to root out foreign spies after an inspector general review identified management problems, government officials said.

    Air Force fails new nuclear reviews
    February 4, 2009
    Air Force nuclear units have failed two inspections in the past three months, providing fresh evidence that the military service that jarred the world in 2007 by mistakenly transporting live nuclear weapons across the United States continues to suffer lapses in its management of intercontinental ballistic missiles.

    Gen. David Baker dies at 62
    January 31, 2009
    Retired Air Force Brig. Gen. David E. Baker, a combat fighter pilot and former Vietnam War prisoner of war, died Thursday of congestive heart failure. He was 62.

    Obama wants Bush war team to stay
    December 23, 2008
    Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates is asking many of the Bush administration's 250 Pentagon political appointees to remain on the job until the incoming Obama administration finds replacements -- a move designed to prevent a leadership vacuum with U.S. troops engaged in wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    U.S. to tighten export rules on 5 firms in China
    December 17, 2008
    The U.S. government is taking steps to suspend a program that allows five companies in China to obtain sensitive U.S. technology without an export license, according to documents and interviews.

    Obama, McCain eye better use of spies
    October 23, 2008
    The next president will take office with plans to continue reforming the U.S. intelligence community and to put more emphasis on improving human intelligence.

    Military report: Terms 'jihad,' 'Islamist' needed
    October 20, 2008
    A U.S. military "Red Team" charged with challenging conventional thinking says that words like "jihad" and "Islamist" are needed in discussing 21st-century terrorism and that federal agencies that avoid the words soft-pedaled the link between religious extremism and violent acts.

  • Full report by U.S. Central Command Red Team

    Trouble on the Mountain: Norad's move increases security risks
    October 5, 2008
    Nestled a half mile inside a hardened rock tunnel, the Cheyenne Mountain Operations Center buzzed with excitement on July 4, 2006, as the shuttle Discovery prepared to launch. Then, at approximately 1:30 p.m. during the final countdown at Florida's Kennedy Space Center, the center's alarms and strobes shrieked to life. Defense satellites had picked up a heat-related signature half a world away. An expert crew at the mountain quickly identified it as a missile, pinpointing its type, location and telemetry. It had been launched from North Korea and was headed east. Several more missile launches were detected including a long-range Taepodong II capable of striking the western United States.

    China report urges missile shield
    October 1, 2008
    The United States needs new weapon systems, including missile defenses and other advanced military capabilities, to deter and counter China's steady buildup of nuclear and conventional arms, according to a draft internal report by a State Department advisory board.

  • Full report on China's Strategic Modernization

    Ex-official reports counterintelligence is weak
    September 30, 2008
    U.S. government efforts to counter foreign spies remains fragmented and weak, despite a series of highly damaging spy cases, said a report made public Monday by a former high-ranking counterintelligence official.

    Passport printer repays $51 million
    Thursday, September 24, 2008
    The Government Printing Office has repaid $51 million to the State Department for overcharges from the sale of millions of blank passports, according to GPO officials and internal government documents.

    Gates set to unveil 9/11 memorial
    September 11, 2008
    Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates was on his way to a business meeting in St. Louis seven years ago when his life was suddenly disrupted. Like thousands of other air travelers, he was diverted, and he spent three days waiting in Kansas City, Mo.

    Russians pilfer U.S. equipment
    September 9, 2008
    Russian forces seized U.S. military equipment during the recent fighting in Georgia in addition to five vehicles whose capture was reported earlier, the Pentagon said Monday.

    WH careful on cutting ties with Moscow
    September 3, 2008
    The Bush administration has ordered a review of U.S. defense cooperation programs with Russia but is not about to draw up "mindless lists" of penalties that could alienate the Russian people while leaving Moscow's troops in Georgia, U.S. officials said Tuesday.

    U.S. nuke spotters sent to China before games
    June 20, 2008
    The Bush administration has dispatched a secret team of nuclear specialists to China in response to Chinese concerns that terrorists may attempt to set off a radiological bomb during the Beijing Summer Olympics, The Washington Times has learned.

    Covert board called crucial to presidents
    Monday, June 16, 2008
    Presidents need to rely on a little-known group of intelligence advisers that since the 1950s has helped guide policies and oversee the U.S. intelligence bureaucracy, according to a report by former intelligence officials.

    Covert board called crucial to presidents
    June 16, 2008
    Presidents need to rely on a little-known group of intelligence advisers that since the 1950s has helped guide policies and oversee the U.S. intelligence bureaucracy, according to a report by former intelligence officials.

    China gets U.S. Olympic help
    June 5, 2008
    The Bush administration has approved the export of sensitive equipment and expertise to China's military and police forces to bolster security at the Beijing Olympics, according to a number of private and public interviews and documents.

    Passport cards called security vulnerability
    May 16, 2008
    The State Department will soon begin production of an electronic passport card that security specialists and members of Congress fear will be vulnerable to alteration or counterfeiting.

    Bomber in Iraq tied to Gitmo
    May 8, 2008
    A detainee released from the prison at Guantanamo Bay three years ago is blamed for a deadly suicide bombing in Iraq, highlighting the danger of releasing hard-bitten terrorists from the U.S. facility in Cuba.

    Hayden warns of Russian unrest
    May 1, 2008
    Russia's declining population will require Moscow to import foreign workers, increasing racial and religious tensions in the former superpower that still has thousands of nuclear weapons, CIA Director Michael V. Hayden said.

    U.S. eyes passport ring in Thailand
    April 29, 2008
    U.S. government security agencies are investigating a criminal ring in Thailand that produced counterfeit passports and other travel documents, including hundreds of fake U.S. passports sold on the black market, Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials said yesterday.

    Intelligence on Syria delayed to avoid fight
    April 25, 2008
    The U.S. delayed disclosing its intelligence on Syria's nuclear program for months after an Israeli raid in order to give Damascus breathing room and avoid goading it into military retaliation, senior U.S. intelligence officials said yesterday.

    Taiwan Strait tension cools off
    April 17, 2008
    The United States sent three aircraft carrier strike groups to waters around Taiwan after China told U.S. officials last year there was high risk of a military incident after Taiwan's March 22 presidential election, according to Pentagon and military officials.

    Passport official quits amid probes
    April 5, 2008
    The State Department official in charge of U.S. passport services stepped down yesterday amid investigations into security breaches in the document records and overcharges for blank passports.

    China order targets dissent
    April 4, 2008
    China's ruling Communist Party has ordered regional party leaders to use military and intelligence units to crack down "harshly" on dissent and step up spying throughout the country as part of security measures before the upcoming Olympic Games, according to a purported internal party document.

    GPO's backup plant on Gulf
    March 28, 2008
    When the government finally built a backup passport center to be used in case Washington became debilitated, it picked a location directly in the path of potential future disaster, the hurricane-prone Mississippi Gulf Coast, which was ravaged by Katrina just a few years ago.

    State Department to probe electronic passport charges
    March 28, 2008
    The State Department is investigating whether it is being overcharged for blank electronic passports by the Government Printing Office, the sole maker of the new travel document, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice said yesterday.

    GPO profits go to bonuses and trips
    March 27, 2008
    When the government's main printing agency booked $100 million in unexpected profit it went on a spending spree: large bonuses to top managers, trips to Paris and Las Vegas, and an official photo of the boss that cost $10,000.

    Congress, watchdog probe passport security
    March 27, 2008
    Three House leaders and the Government Printing Office's watchdog said yesterday that they are investigating security concerns about the production of electronic passports highlighted during an investigation by The Washington Times.

    Outsourced passport work risky
    March 26, 2008
    The United States has outsourced the manufacturing of its electronic passports to overseas companies including one in Thailand that was victimized by Chinese espionage raising concerns that cost savings are being put ahead of national security, an investigation by The Washington Times has found.

    Spy for China gets 24 years
    March 25, 2008
    A federal judge yesterday sentenced a Chinese-born U.S. engineer to 24 years in prison for his role in supplying sensitive military technology to China, saying he was sending a message to China's intelligence services.

    Obama passport files violated
    March 21, 2008
    Two State Department employees were fired recently and a third disciplined for improperly accessing electronic personal data on Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Barack Obama, Bush administration officials said yesterday.

    3Com won't merge with Chinese firm
    March 21, 2008
    An investment firm ended the last possibility of a proposed merger between the telecommunications company 3Com and a Chinese firm by saying yesterday the deal would not be restructured and offered again for U.S. government review.

    Hayden takes China to task
    March 13, 2008
    China is "strangling" emerging island democracies in the Pacific in pursuit of narrow goals such as friendly votes at the United Nations, CIA Director Michael V. Hayden said in an interview in which he criticized Beijing's failure to act as a responsible global power.

    Ethnic dispute tears al Qaeda, Hayden says
    March 12, 2008
    Internal divisions between Saudi and Egyptian leaders of al Qaeda are producing "fissures" within the terrorist group and a possible battle over who will succeed Osama bin Laden, CIA Director Michael V. Hayden said yesterday.

    Hayden: Don't ban tough methods
    March 11, 2008
    CIA Director Michael Hayden argued today in favor of permitting his agency to retain harsh interrogation techniques that are not spelled out in the latest Army field manual, which was revised in the fall of 2006 amid controversy over the handling of detainees in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    U.S. to broach nuke concerns with China
    March 4, 2008
    The Pentagon is set to begin strategic arms talks with China amid concerns outlined in an annual report questioning Beijing's control over the military's growing nuclear arsenal.

    China speeds pace of military buildup
    March 3, 2008
    China is speeding up its military buildup and developing high-technology forces for waging wars beyond Taiwan, according to the Pentagon's annual report on Chinese military power.

    U.S. will down failed satellite
    February 15,, 2008
    The Pentagon's plan to shoot down a failed satellite with a missile defense interceptor in the coming days is aimed at preventing toxic fuel from reaching earth. But U.S. officials and experts said yesterday it would also signal that U.S. missile defenses can be used to counter China's strategic anti-satellite weapons.

    Firms in proposed 3Com deal offer risk relief
    February 13, 2008
    Companies involved in the proposed merger of 3Com and a Chinese telecommunications company have offered to take steps to reduce the national security risks from the deal in seeking to win the Bush administration's approval.

    4 arrests in China spy cases
    February 12, 2008
    Federal agents arrested a Pentagon official and three other persons yesterday in a nationwide sweep of Chinese espionage agents.

    N. Korea would sell nukes to terrorists
    February 5, 2008
    North Korea threatened to export nuclear weapons to international terrorists in 2005, according to a U.S. intelligence report made public yesterday.

    Congress to probe 3Com-Huawei deal
    February 2, 2008
    A bipartisan group of lawmakers announced yesterday that Congress is investigating the proposed merger of 3Com Corp. and a Chinese company over concerns about China's computer-hacking activities.

    Poland agrees to house U.S. missile inceptors
    February 2, 2008
    Poland's government has agreed in principle to allow the Pentagon to set up a U.S. missile interceptor site on Polish territory to counter Iranian missiles, Warsaw's foreign minister said yesterday.

    Beijing espionage poses 'No. 1' threat
    January 30, 2008
    China's aggressive spying, technology theft and computer attacks pose the most significant threats to U.S. national security, officials and analysts told a congressional hearing yesterday.

    Al Qaeda makes strides in Pakistan
    January 24, 2008
    Al Qaeda forces are gaining strength in remote areas of Pakistan and stepping up activities in that country, the region and farther abroad, according to recent U.S. intelligence assessments.

    Treasury gets new CFIUS authority
    January 24, 2008
    President Bush yesterday signed a new executive order on foreign investment that gives the Treasury secretary, instead of the president, key power to authorize or reject purchases of U.S. companies by foreign buyers.

    N. Korea talks left out details
    January 23, 2008
    North Korea's recent discussions with the United States about a required declaration under the six-nation nuclear talks omitted key data on Pyongyang's current nuclear arsenal and its covert uranium enrichment program, U.S. officials say.

    Republicans: FISA authority in Constitution
    January 21, 2008
    Authority to conduct warrantless electronic surveillance comes from the Constitution and is vital to stopping foreign terrorist attacks and spies, says a Republican staff assessment of the revised Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.

    Admiral pursues Chinese answers, ties
    January 16, 2008
    The commander of U.S. Pacific forces said in Beijing yesterday that he is troubled by China's missile buildup and anti-satellite weapons, but hopes military ties to its Communist Party-led forces will improve.

    Sub technology revealed in court during spy appeal
    January 15, 2008
    Details of U.S. Navy advanced engine-silencing technology for submarines were disclosed in court documents last week during an appeal hearing for convicted Chinese spy Chi Mak.

    U.S. satellites dodge Chinese missile debris
    January 11, 2008
    Two orbiting U.S. spacecraft were forced to change course to avoid being damaged by the thousands of pieces of space debris produced after China carried out an anti-satellite weapon test one year ago today.

    Gates sees division in Chinese actions
    December 22, 2007
    Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said yesterday that recent military incidents involving the U.S. and China indicate troubling signs of division between Beijing's military and the nation's communist political leaders.

    China taps into U.S. spy operations
    December 21, 2007
    China's intelligence service gained access to a secret National Security Agency listening post in Hawaii through a Chinese-language translation service, according to U.S. intelligence officials.

    Engineer indicted on spying
    December 12, 2007
    A former U.S. defense contractor spent more than two years working with China's military to design and test a radar-evading component for a new Chinese cruise missile as part of an espionage conspiracy, according to a federal indictment.

    Justice, DHS 'still object' to CFIUS order
    December 6, 2007
    National security and trade officials are deadlocked over provisions of a draft White House order aimed at bolstering the security aspects of the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, The Washington Times has learned.

    Pentagon eyes China nuke talks
    December 6, 2007
    The Pentagon this week proposed holding a strategic nuclear "dialogue" with China, as Chinese military officials asked that Congress lift its guidelines banning military exchanges with Beijing on nuclear operations.

    Estimate of Iran's nukes reversed
    December 4, 2007
    Iran halted a secret nuclear-weapons program in 2003 under international pressure but still can produce a nuclear bomb by 2010 to 2015, according to a new U.S. intelligence estimate released yesterday.

    Port incident strains U.S.-China talks
    December 4, 2007
    Senior U.S. and Chinese military and defense officials met yesterday at the Pentagon for annual talks amid a dispute over China's refusal to allow U.S. warships to make port calls in Hong Kong.

    Intelligence report hits China deal
    November 30, 2007
    U.S. intelligence agencies informed a Treasury Department-led review committee recently that a merger between 3Com and a Chinese company would threaten U.S. national security, The Washington Times has learned.

    Beijing denies calling action a mistake
    November 30, 2007
    A U.S.-China dispute over the blocked port visit of a U.S. aircraft carrier strike group to Hong Kong escalated yesterday after China's government denied that China's foreign minister told the president the incident was a mistake.

    Pentagon protests China's Navy block
    November 29,, 2007
    The Pentagon issued a formal protest to China's military yesterday over its refusal to allow a U.S. aircraft carrier strike group to dock in Hong Kong over the Thanksgiving holiday.

    China's action troubles admiral
    November 28, 2007
    China's refusal to allow U.S. warships to visit Hong Kong recently was carried out to protest U.S. sales of Patriot missile equipment to Taiwan, Bush administration officials said yesterday.

    U.S., Russia discuss missile defense
    November 27, 2007
    U.S. and Russian negotiators met yesterday to discuss a U.S. plan for joint missile defenses in Europe that would include delayed activation of missile interceptors, Bush administration officials said.

    Officials decry port denial
    November 24, 2007
    The Pentagon criticized China yesterday for denying a Thanksgiving Day port visit to Hong Kong by the USS Kitty Hawk, but would not say whether the snub will lead to limits on military exchanges with Beijing.

    China's 'arsenal' spurs warnings
    November 22, 2007
    The U.S. military is vulnerable to China's advanced war-fighting systems, including space weapons and computer attacks that would be used in a future conflict over Taiwan, according to a congressional commission"s report released yesterday.

    CAIR seeks removal of label in terrorism case
    November 21, 2007
    The Council on American-Islamic Relations is seeking help from House Judiciary Committee Chairman John Conyers Jr. to pressure the Justice Department to change the group's status as a co-conspirator in a terrorism case.

    Security review changes panned
    November 7, 2007
    Lawmakers from both parties yesterday challenged the Bush administration over a draft presidential order that they say will undermine a law designed to improve security reviews of foreign companies seeking to buy U.S. firms.

    Foreign business gets a Bush assist
    November 6, 2007
    A draft presidential order on foreign investment in U.S. companies would limit government security reviews and give more power to such pro-business agencies as the Treasury Department, The Washington Times has learned.

    Chinese still silent on space weapons
    November 6, 2007
    China's defense minister refused to discuss the recent test of a new anti-satellite weapon, highlighting U.S. concerns about excessive military secrecy, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said yesterday.

    Chinese military boosts hacking
    November 2, 2007
    HONOLULU -- Senior military commanders at the U.S. Pacific Command here said China's recent test of an anti-satellite weapon and increased computer-hacking activities prompted increased defenses for U.S. forces in the region and in space.

    Mullen: U.S. can strike Iran
    October 19, 2007
    U.S. military forces are capable of conducting operations against Iran if called on to bomb nuclear facilities or other targets, the new Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said yesterday.

    Patience sought on China deal
    October 17, 2007
    The White House yesterday said critics of a proposed merger between a U.S. maker of computer-security equipment and a Chinese company should give an interagency national-security review a chance to do its job.

    Bush urged to block merger
    October 16, 2007
    House Republicans have introduced legislation calling for the Bush administration to block the merger of a U.S. computer-security equipment company and a Chinese firm with close ties to Beijing's military and a history of illicit exports and industrial espionage.

    Paulson hands off merger review
    October 5,, 2007
    Treasury Secretary Henry M. Paulson will recuse himself from a government review of the merger between 3Com and a Chinese company because of his past relationship with an investment firm involved in the deal.

    GOP urges probe in China firm deal
    October 4, 2007
    Several Republican members of Congress yesterday called for a Treasury Department probe into whether Pentagon computer networks will be compromised by the merger of a U.S. network-equipment maker and a Chinese firm with links to Beijing's military.

    Merger opens U.S. defense to China
    October 3, 2007
    A Chinese company with ties to Beijing's military and past links to Saddam Hussein's army in Iraq and the Taliban will gain access to U.S. defense-network technology under a proposed merger, Pentagon officials say.

    FBI reaching out to jihadist-linked group
    September 28, 2007
    The FBI is cooperating with a U.S. Muslim group recently linked to global extremists and is asking the group to provide "cultural training" for its special agents, according to a Senate Judiciary Committee report.

    FBI chief orders internal probe
    September 27, 2007
    Former Rep. Curt Weldon, Pennsylvania Republican, is said to suspect careerists and Democratic sympathizers in the Justice Department worked covertly with former Clinton administration officials to defeat him in the 2006 election.

    Chinese dissident urges boycott of Olympics
    September 21, 2007
    A leading Chinese dissident called on Congress yesterday to lead an international boycott of the upcoming Beijing Olympics because of China's human rights abuses and support for rogue regimes.

    U.S. watches Syria, Israel after air strike
    September 18, 2007
    U.S. intelligence agencies have stepped up monitoring of Syria and Israel for signs of a new military confrontation after a recent Israeli air strike inside Syria, Bush administration officials said yesterday.

    Algeria, China teamed on nuke
    September 17, 2007
    Newly declassified U.S. government documents confirm the U.S. government suspected China was helping Algeria build a secret facility in 1991 for developing nuclear weapons.

    Al Qaeda still plots another U.S. attack
    September 11, 2007
    Al Qaeda terrorists continue to plan and train for a major attack against the United States, but so far, there are no signs that the group's extremists have infiltrated into the country, senior U.S. security and intelligence officials told Congress yesterday.

    Chinese donor sounds like '96
    September 4, 2007
    Questionable donations to Democratic officials and presidential candidates from a Chinese-American businessman highlight past concerns over Chinese political influence-buying operations.

    Report: Iraqi stability growing
    August 24, 2007
    Growing Sunni opposition to al Qaeda and in some cases the perception that U.S. troops will leave the country are key factors behind recent and growing stability in Iraq, according to a major U.S. intelligence report based on findings from 16 agencies.

    CIA failed to plot against al Qaeda
    August 22, 2007
    The CIA lacked a strategy to counter al Qaeda in the months leading up to the September 11 attacks and committed multiple analytical and operational failures that prevented the agency from stopping Osama bin Laden's terror group, according to a once-secret CIA inspector general report released yesterday.

    China won't allow U.S. to check out fighter jet
    August 14, 2007
    China"s military recently turned down a request by the United States to see the new Chinese J-10 fighter but allowed visits to two operational fighter bases, the commander of Pacific Air Forces said yesterday.

    FBI calls Chinese espionage 'substantial'
    July 27, 2007
    FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III said yesterday that Chinese intelligence operations against the United States are a major problem and that the FBI is stepping up counterespionage efforts against them.

    Al Qaeda seen in search of nukes
    July 26, 2007
    Al Qaeda terrorists are continuing to plan attacks against the United States and are seeking nuclear and other unconventional arms for the strikes, a senior Pentagon official told Congress yesterday.

    Al Qaeda 'evolving' against U.S.
    July 18, 2007
    Al Qaeda terrorists are rebuilding their capabilities and continuing to plan mass-casualty attacks inside the United States, according to an intelligence assessment made public yesterday.

    Bin Laden search frustrates officials
    July 12, 2007
    Senior U.S. intelligence officials yesterday defended unsuccessful efforts to capture al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden who they say has eluded a global manhunt for years by hiding in tribal areas of Pakistan under the protection of local leaders.

    [Note to readers: Some links to stories below are no longer available due to changes in url coding on The Washington Times web site. Those that are unavailable may be accessed via a Google web search of headlines or cached pages. -- Bill Gertz]

    China arms talks, reciprocity stalled
    June 14, 2007
    China continues to put off nuclear weapons talks with the United States that were promised by Beijing's leader and has not matched U.S. openness in recent military exchanges, a senior Pentagon official told Congress yesterday.

    Pace casualty of party politics
    June 13, 2007
    The Bush administration sought to avert a political fight with such Senate Democrats as Hillary Rodham Clinton and Carl Levin over Iraq and homosexuals in the military by not renominating Marine Corps Gen. Peter Pace to a second term as Joint Chiefs of Staff chairman.

    Data on N. Korea centrifuges sought
    June 12, 2007
    North Korea purchased some two dozen centrifuges from the Pakistani nuclear supplier network headed by A.Q. Khan and must account for the equipment as part of the stalled nuclear agreement, said a senior Bush administration official.

    Gates vows not to forget Asian security interests
    June 2, 2007
    Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said today that the United States will remain actively engaged in Asia despite its commitments to fighting the war on terrorism and the conflict in Iraq.

    Pentagon tracks global buildup in China's military
    May 26, 2007
    China's military buildup is moving beyond countering Taiwan to global operations from the Middle East through Southeast Asia, according to the Pentagon's annual assessment of Chinese military power.

    Pentagon details China's new military strategies
    May 25, 2007
    The Pentagon's forthcoming annual report on Chinese military power will reveal a growing threat from Beijing's new forms of power projection, including anti-satellite weapons and computer network attack forces.

    Navy engages in maneuvers off Iran's Gulf coast
    May 24, 2007
    The Navy began a major exercise near Iran's Persian Gulf coast yesterday amid tensions with Tehran over stepped-up nuclear activities and ongoing support for insurgents in Iraq.

    Engineer guilty in plot to give data to China
    May 11, 2007
    A Chinese-born engineer was convicted in federal court in California yesterday of being an unregistered Chinese agent who conspired to supply defense technology to Beijing.

    War debate cited as aiding al Qaeda
    May 10, 2007
    Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates yesterday told Congress that al Qaeda will establish a stronghold in Iraq's Anbar province if U.S. troops pull out prematurely and that the group is reacting to the war debate in Washington by stepping up attacks.

    Plot illustrates Balkans' role as Islamist foothold
    May 9, 2007
    The six foreign-born Muslims accused of planning a shooting attack at the U.S. military base included four ethnic Albanians, and U.S. officials say their arrests highlight how Islamist groups are using the Balkans region to help in recruiting and financing terrorism.

    Top officer says U.S. forces stopping al Qaeda flow in Iraq
    May 4, 2007
    U.S. forces in Iraq are stemming the flow of foreign al Qaeda terrorists into the country, the commander of the U.S. Central Command told a Senate panel yesterday.

    Putin not able to track all nukes
    May 2, 2007
    Russian President Vladimir Putin told President Bush he could not account for all of Moscow's nuclear weapons at the same time al Qaeda was seeking to purchase three Russian nuclear devices on the black market, former CIA Director George J. Tenet said.

    China blamed for rejection of WHO support
    May 1, 2007
    China is behind efforts within the World Health Organization (WHO) to exclude Taiwan, despite the growing threat of Asian viral epidemics on the island, Taiwan's unofficial ambassador to the U.S. said yesterday.

    U.S. general calls al Qaeda 'public enemy No. 1' in Iraq
    April 27, 2007
    The commander of U.S. forces in Iraq said yesterday that al Qaeda terrorists are behind the recent spate of deadly car bombings and are now "public enemy No. 1" in the country.

    Iraq war briefing fails to end split
    April 26, 2007
    The commander of U.S. forces in Iraq briefed members of Congress yesterday on the war in a session that both Democrats and Republicans say reinforced their views.

    N. Korea making nukes, will test again, general says
    April 25, 2007
    North Korea is continuing to develop nuclear weapons and will conduct additional underground blasts aimed at regional "intimidation," the commander of U.S. forces in South Korea said yesterday.

    Iran sending arms to Afghanistan, Iraq, Pace says
    April 18,, 2007
    Iran is shipping arms and explosives to Afghanistan, in addition to providing deadly armor-piercing bombs covertly to Iraqi insurgents, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said yesterday.

    Chinese defector describes agents' reach in Canada
    April 17, 2007
    China's embassy in Canada is engaged in an aggressive effort to harass dissidents, including attempts to influence government agencies to limit anti-communist broadcasters, a Chinese defector and religious dissident said.

    Iraq, Afghan tours grow to 15 months for soldiers
    April 12, 2007
    Troop deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan will be extended from 12 to 15 months for active-duty soldiers, the Pentagon announced yesterday.

    U.S. military buildup urged to counter China
    April 11, 2007
    The United States should build up military forces in Asia to counter China's military expansion, according to a report on U.S.-China relations by a blue-ribbon panel.

    Beijing space test scattered debris
    April 10, 2007
    China's test of an anti-satellite weapon increased the number of space-debris pieces threatening U.S. and other nations' satellites by more than 9 percent, a senior Air Force Space Command official said.

    China mum on Pace query on anti-satellite system
    April 6, 2007
    China's senior military leaders refused to disclose any details about a recent test of a new anti-satellite weapon system or other aspects of a secret space-arms program, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff told reporters yesterday.

    British hostages untrained in rules of incarceration
    April 4, 2007
    The 15 British sailors and marines captured by Iran were not trained to withstand captivity in hostile hands, British defense officials said yesterday.

    2 Indians charged in missile-technology export
    April 3, 2007
    Two Indian nationals have been arrested on charges of illegally exporting U.S. missile technology to India in a case that U.S. officials say could affect a pending deal on nuclear and space cooperation between the two nations.

    China has gained and tested array of space weapons
    March 30, 2007
    China is developing an "impressive" array of space weapons, including missiles and jammers, and is moving toward placing nuclear weapons in space to attack U.S. satellites, the commander of U.S. strategic forces told the Senate yesterday.

    Chinese military shakes region
    March 29, 2007
    China is continuing an aggressive military buildup in secret and deploying missiles near Taiwan that are increasing instability in the region, a State Department official told Congress yesterday.

    Stepped-up counterintelligence OK'd
    March 28, 2007
    President Bush has approved a new counterintelligence strategy that calls for expanding operations against foreign spies and terrorists worldwide and stepping up coordination among U.S. agencies.

    Engineer goes to trial in China military spy case
    March 27, 2007
    China's efforts to use spying to gain U.S. military technology will get a close look during the trial of a Chinese-born defense contractor set to begin today near Los Angeles.

    Iraqi colonel flees military training in Alabama
    March 22, 2007
    An Iraqi air force colonel disappeared recently from an Alabama Air Force base and is being sought in a regional manhunt by federal and military agents, defense officials say.

    DIA official warns about Cuban spies
    March 15, 2007
    Cuban intelligence agents are working inside the U.S. government and one mole uncovered in the Defense Intelligence Agency caused the death of a U.S. special operations soldier in Central America, a senior DIA counterintelligence official says in a new book.

    Beijing shields goals of military modernization
    March 8, 2007
    China's large-scale military buildup is being monitored closely and Beijing has not explained the goal of the modernization, senior defense and military leaders said yesterday.

    China's spies 'very aggressive' threat to U.S.
    March 6, 2007
    China's intelligence services are among the most aggressive at spying on the United States, followed by Cuban, Russian and Iranian spy agencies, according to the U.S. government's top counterintelligence coordinator.

    China expands sub fleet
    March 2, 2007
    China's military is engaged in a major buildup of submarines that includes five new strategic nuclear-missile boats and several advanced nuclear-powered attack submarines, according to the Office of Naval Intelligence.

    McConnell fears Iran nukes by 2015
    February 28, 2007
    Iran's development of nuclear arms is "very dangerous," and Tehran could deploy the weapons within the next several years, the nation's most senior intelligence official told the Senate yesterday.

    Ex-CIA official urges silence after spy 'sting'
    February 27, 2007
    A former high-ranking CIA official refused FBI appeals for help in tracking Chinese spies and urged others via e-mail not to cooperate because of the recent prosecution of former Defense Intelligence Agency analyst Ron Montaperto.

    Al Qaeda believed behind copter crashes
    February 23, 2007
    Two or three al Qaeda terrorist cells in Iraq are behind the recent series of helicopter shootdowns, a senior U.S. commander in Iraq said yesterday.

    Iran provided bombs, Pentagon says
    February 16, 2007
    Senior defense and military leaders said yesterday that Iran's government is behind the providing of deadly bombs to Iraqi insurgents, although it is difficult to say whether senior Iranian leaders approved the shipments.

    Bolton hits agreement as 'bad signal' to Iran
    February 14, 2007
    The deal reached in Beijing on North Korea's nuclear program is being criticized for making too many concessions to the hard-line government that violated a past accord, and gives up key U.S. leverage that blocked illicit financial activities by Pyongyang in the past.

    Intelligence estimate warns on quick Iraq pullout
    February 3, 2007
    A new National Intelligence Estimate on Iraq warns that pulling U.S. troops out of the country too soon would lead to a collapse of the Iraqi military, outside intervention and the creation of safe havens for al Qaeda terrorists.

    U.S. halts China space ventures
    February 2, 2007
    The Bush administration has suspended plans to develop space ventures with China, including joint exploration of the moon, in reaction to Beijing's Jan. 11 test of an anti-satellite weapon that left orbiting debris threatening U.S. and foreign satellites.

    How the 'axis' seeks the killer missile
    January 30, 2007
    North Korea and Iran are cooperating in developing long-range missiles, the deputy director of the Pentagon's Missile Defense Agency said yesterday.

    General to be asked about Beijing's test
    January 30, 2007
    China's most senior military war planner is visiting the United States, and Pentagon officials plan to question him about Beijing's recent anti-satellite test.

    Pentagon eyes missile defenses in Eastern Europe
    January 26, 2007
    The Pentagon is moving rapidly to build new missile defenses in Poland and the Czech Republic to counter the threat posed by Iranian long-range missiles, the head of the Missile Defense Agency said yesterday.

    Analyst rebuked over his support of spy for China
    January 25, 2007
    A senior U.S. intelligence analyst has been formally criticized for "poor judgment" after writing a letter and e-mails in support of a convicted former Defense Intelligence Agency analyst, U.S. intelligence officials said.

    Officials fear war in space by China
    January 24, 2007
    China's anti-satellite-interceptor test Jan. 11 is part of a covert space-weapons program designed to cripple the U.S. military in a conflict, defense officials said yesterday as Beijing confirmed it had destroyed one of its weather satellites. China said it had not "weaponized" space.

    Moscow, Beijing eye space weapons
    January 17, 2007
    China and Russia are developing space weapons and are among several nations working on systems to threaten U.S. satellites with lasers or missiles, says the director of the Defense Intelligence Agency.

    Pakistan will close four camps to foil Afghan terror
    January 16, 2007
    Pakistan's government will close four refugee camps near its border with Afghanistan to help prevent Afghan insurgents from gunrunning and seeking safe haven in the country, Islamabad's ambassador to the United States said yesterday.

    Chinese general's U.S. visit for nuke talks deferred
    January 15, 2007
    China's military is delaying the U.S. visit of its strategic nuclear forces commander despite a promise by Chinese President Hu Jintao last year that the general would hold talks with the U.S. Strategic Command leader.

    Intelligence officials see growing sectarian split in Iraq
    January 12, 2007
    Sectarian divisions and related violence in Iraq are growing, as al Qaeda remains the most serious national-security threat facing the United States, senior U.S. intelligence officials told Congress yesterday.

    U.S. presses China on armed submarine encounter
    January 11, 2007
    The admiral in charge of the U.S. Pacific Fleet pressed Chinese military leaders to explain why an armed submarine challenged a U.S. aircraft carrier in the western Pacific by sailing within five miles of the warship, U.S. defense officials said.

    China, Russia hit sanctions as 'wrong'
    January 11, 2007
    The governments of China and Russia have denounced sanctions imposed on their state-run companies by the Bush administration over missile and weapons of mass destruction sales to Iran and Syria.

    Sanctions imposed on Iran, Syria arms suppliers
    January 5,, 2007
    The Bush administration is imposing economic sanctions on Chinese, Russian and North Korean companies for selling missiles and weapons goods to Iran and Syria, administration officials said.

    Negroponte to shift to No. 2 diplomat
    January 5, 2007
    In a day of shake-ups for the Bush administration yesterday, President Bush lost his chief counsel and signaled he will shift the top intelligence official to become the No. 2 diplomat at the State Department, and will tap a former admiral to take his place as head of the intelligence community.

    Foreign spy activity surges to fill technology gap
    January 3, 2007
    Foreign spies are stepping up efforts to obtain secret U.S. technology through methods ranging from sexual entrapment to Internet hacking, with China and other Asian countries leading the targeting of U.S. defense contractors.

    U.S. to defend space with military force
    December 14, 2006
    The United States will use military force in space to protect satellites and other space systems from attack by hostile states or terrorists, the Bush administration's senior arms-control official said yesterday.

    General foresees 'generational war' against terrorism
    December 13, 2006
    The American people need to prepare for a long-duration war against radical Muslims who are set to fight for 50 to 100 years to create an Islamist state in the region, a top Pentagon strategist in the war on terror says.

    Surprise terrorist attacks remain top threat
    December 12, 2006
    A surprise attack on the United States by terrorists is the most worrying threat facing the country, while a nuclear detonation by al Qaeda here remains a low probability, the admiral in charge of the U.S. Northern Command says.

    Analysts: Bin Laden alive but hamstrung
    December 6, 2006
    U.S. intelligence agencies think al Qaeda leaders Osama bin Laden and Ayman al-Zawahri are alive and still plotting attacks, even though both have eluded a massive manhunt for more than five years since the September 11 terrorist attacks.

    Sailor to plead on secrets to Russia
    December 1, 2006
    Russia obtained valuable secrets on U.S. Navy attack submarines from a technician facing court-martial next week on espionage and other charges, U.S. officials said.

    Chinese hackers prompt Navy college site closure
    November 30, 2006
    Chinese computer hackers penetrated the Naval War College network earlier this month, forcing security authorities to shut down all e-mail and official computer network work at the Navy's school for senior officers.

    Canada arrests 'illegal' spy from Russian intelligence
    November 25, 2006
    Canada's security service recently arrested a deep-cover Russian intelligence officer posing as a Canadian citizen in what officials say is a rare capture of an "illegal" spy.

    China bought bomber secrets
    November 23, 2006
    China obtained secret stealth technology used on B-2 bomber engines from a Hawaii-based spy ring in a compromise U.S. officials say will allow Beijing to copy or counter a key weapon in the Pentagon's new strategy against China.

    China buildup seen aimed at U.S. ships
    November 22, 2006
    China's military buildup includes new missiles and naval weapons designed to sink U.S. aircraft carriers and deny U.S. forces access to the Asia-Pacific region, a congressional commission official said yesterday.

    Admiral says sub risked a shootout
    November 15, 2006
    The Navy's top commander in the Pacific said yesterday that a Chinese submarine risked setting off a military confrontation by closely shadowing a U.S. aircraft carrier sailing near Japan.

    Defenses on subs to be reviewed
    November 14, 2006
    Navy officials confirmed yesterday that an aircraft carrier battle group failed to detect a Chinese submarine that surfaced within weapons range of the USS Kitty Hawk. Anti-submarine defenses for the carrier battle group will be reviewed as a result, they said.

    China sub secretly stalked U.S. fleet
    November 13, 2006
    A Chinese submarine stalked a U.S. aircraft carrier battle group in the Pacific last month and surfaced within firing range of its torpedoes and missiles before being detected, The Washington Times has learned.

    Gates to offer 'fresh perspective' on Iraq
    November 9, 2006
    Former CIA Director Robert M. Gates, President Bush's choice to be the new defense secretary, is a retired career intelligence analyst with little experience in military and defense affairs.

    U.S. speeds attack plans for North Korea
    November 3, 2006
    The Pentagon has stepped up planning for attacks against North Korea's nuclear program and is bolstering nuclear forces in Asia, said defense officials familiar with the highly secret process.

    Chinese defector finds no asylum
    November 1, 2006
    A former high-ranking Chinese technology specialist has defected and is seeking political asylum in the United States in order to promote democratic change in China.

    China cited as N. Korea supplier
    October 31, 2006
    China helped North Korea develop nuclear weapons and in the past year increased its support to Pyongyang, rather than pressing the regime to halt nuclear arms and missile activities, according to a congressional report.

    U.S., allies fear 2nd nuke test by Pyongyang
    October 18, 2006
    The United States and two allies voiced new worries yesterday that North Korea is set to conduct a second underground nuclear test, as Pyongyang said that new U.N. sanctions are tantamount to a declaration of war.

    U.S. verifies Korean test was nuclear
    October 17, 2006
    U.S. intelligence agencies confirmed yesterday that the blast detected in North Korea last week was a smaller-than-expected nuclear detonation, based on the presence of radioactive particles collected near the test site.

    U.S. finding indicates nuclear test
    October 14, 2006
    U.S. intelligence agencies have detected radioactive particles in air samples collected near North Korea's nuclear testing facility, leading analysts to conclude that the blast detected Monday was a nuclear explosion, Bush administration officials said last night.

    Korean test seen as only partial blast
    October 13, 2006
    Four days after North Korea tried to set off its first nuclear bomb, U.S. intelligence agencies think the blast detected by seismic sensors was a plutonium-fueled device that did not fully explode.

    Intelligence failure cited in Korean crisis
    October 12, 2006
    Recent U.S. intelligence analyses of North Korea's nuclear and missile programs were flawed and the lack of clarity on the issue hampered U.S. diplomatic efforts to avert the underground blast detected Sunday, according to Bush administration officials.

    U.S. doubts Korean test was nuclear
    October 10, 2006
    U.S. intelligence agencies say, based on preliminary indications, that North Korea did not produce its first nuclear blast yesterday.

    Global flow of illicit funds cut
    October 5, 2006
    North Korea and Iran are being squeezed financially by U.S. efforts to discourage international banks and financial institutions from helping the regimes' illicit activities, said the Treasury Department's point man on the issue.

    Tehran denies secret nuke deal
    September 27, 2006
    Iran yesterday said it is not negotiating a secret temporary shutdown of its uranium-enrichment program as part of ongoing talks with the European Union, rebutting Bush administration sources who told The Washington Times that such a deal is being discussed.

    Iran close to nuclear suspension
    September 26, 2006
    Iran is close to an agreement that would include a suspension of uranium enrichment but wants the deal to include a provision that the temporary halt be kept secret, according to Bush administration officials.

    Pentagon analyst gets light jail term
    September 9, 2006
    A former Pentagon analyst who passed highly classified intelligence to two Chinese military officers was sentenced to three months in prison yesterday -- far shy of four to five years called for in sentencing guidelines.

    Leak cost U.S. spy links to Chinese arms sales
    September 8, 2006
    A former analyst for the Pentagon's intelligence service provided China with highly classified information prior to the loss of a major electronic spying operation against Beijing, The Washington Times has learned.

    U.S. test missile hits a Korean bull's-eye
    September 2, 2006
    The U.S. missile defense system yesterday shot down an incoming dummy warhead simulating the last-stage trajectory of a North Korean Taepodong-2 missile, a milestone that U.S. officials expect to counter critics of earlier tests.

    Pentagon sees no civil war in Iraq
    September 2, 2006
    Tribal and religious violence is increasing in Iraq but has not become a civil war, according to a Pentagon quarterly report to Congress made public yesterday.

    U.S. plans for sanctions on Iran
    August 28, 2006
    The Bush administration plans to move rapidly to organize and impose international economic sanctions on Iran, but not until after a Thursday U.N. deadline passes, according to Bush administration officials.

    U.S. eyes Chavez ties to China
    August 25, 2006
    The visit to China by Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez this week is being watched closely by U.S. national security officials who are concerned that Beijing is increasing its backing for the leftist leader.

    Mossad missed Hezbollah threat
    August 16, 2006
    Israel's storied foreign-intelligence service failed to fully understand the threat posed by Hezbollah in southern Lebanon, based on a view among many analysts that the guerrilla organization was an evolving political group, according to U.S. officials and private intelligence specialists.

    British-Pakistani effort thwarted terror 'dry run'
    August 11, 2006
    British and Pakistani officials stepped up an eight-month investigation to prevent a "dry run" of a terrorist attack to blow up more than 10 U.S. airplanes flying between the U.S. and the United Kingdom arresting 24 suspects.

    Sailor charged with spying
    August 10, 2006
    The Navy has charged a sailor with spying for Russia as part of a military espionage case involving a nuclear attack submarine, defense officials said yesterday.

    Nuclear specialists move uranium
    August 10, 2006
    U.S. and international officials completed a covert operation yesterday to remove 90 pounds of easy-to-handle uranium from a research facility in Poland that was vulnerable to theft by terrorists, according to Bush administration officials.

    U.S. to give S. Korea war time control over Korean troops
    August 4,, 2006
    The Pentagon plans to give South Korea wartime operational control over Korean troops within three years and will keep U.S. troop levels at more than 20,000 over the next several years, defense officials said yesterday.

    Hezbollah forces were ready for Israeli retaliation
    August 1, 2006
    Hezbollah fighters were well-prepared for Israeli military actions in southern Lebanon and remain well-armed after three weeks of Israeli attacks on its forces, U.S. intelligence officials said yesterday.

    Hezbollah leader said to be hiding in Iranian Embassy
    July 28, 2006
    Intelligence reports indicate the leader of Hezbollah is hiding in a foreign mission in Beirut, possibly the Iranian Embassy, according to U.S. and Israeli officials.

    Adversary of Goss takes No. 2 CIA post
    July 26, 2006
    A veteran CIA operations official who clashed with former agency Director Porter J. Goss was formally named the deputy CIA director yesterday, raising concerns among critics who say he will hamper reform at the agency.

    Redeployed troops to look for locals' help in Baghdad
    July 26, 2006
    Thousands of U.S. troops being redeployed to Baghdad will try to tamp down growing sectarian violence in Iraq's capital using a "neighborhood-to-neighborhood approach," said National Security Adviser Stephen J. Hadley.

    U.S. eyes new controls on China exports
    July 14, 2006
    The Bush administration is imposing new controls on high-technology exports to China, aimed at preventing illegal diversion of goods that are boosting Beijing's large-scale military buildup, a senior commerce official says.

    N. Korea has more missiles, U.S. says
    July 13, 2006
    Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld has disclosed that North Korea has produced up to five additional long-range missiles, but that none appears ready for launch.

    Hill missile-shield backer fears N. Korea
    July 12, 2006
    North Korea's recent launch of a long-range missile highlights the need for U.S. missile defenses, thus some anti-missile programs will be accelerated as a result, the chairman of the House Armed Services Committee said yesterday.

    Missile defense tested briefly in rocket's failure
    July 6, 2006
    North Korea's firing of seven missiles was the first real test of the new U.S. ground-based missile defense, even though the failure of the long-range Taepodong-2 seconds after launch prevented the Pentagon from responding with a U.S.-based interceptor, defense officials said yesterday.

    Intelligence analyst probed over ties to a spy for China
    July 6, 2006
    A high-ranking U.S. intelligence analyst is facing an internal probe for his support of former Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) analyst Ron Montaperto, who recently pleaded guilty to an espionage-related charge involving contacts with Chinese intelligence.

    North Korea launches missile show
    July 5, 2006
    North Korea launched a volley of missiles yesterday, including a long-range Taepodong-2, which can strike U.S. territory, and five others, including one that landed near Russian territory.

    Friends rallying to defend DIA spy
    July 5, 2006
    A senior intelligence official is leading an effort within the Bush administration to defend former Defense Intelligence Agency China specialist Ronald Montaperto, who pleaded guilty recently to espionage-related charges involving Chinese intelligence.

    '60s nuclear bomb gets life extension
    June 30, 2006
    The Energy Department has completed the first life extension on a 1960s-era nuclear bomb that is part of the Pentagon's strategic deterrent, a senior department official said yesterday.

    Ex-DIA analyst admits passing secrets to China
    June 23,, 2006
    A former Defense Intelligence Agency analyst has pleaded guilty to illegally holding classified documents and admitted in a plea agreement to passing "top secret" information to Chinese intelligence officials.

    N. Korean threat activates shield
    June 20, 2006
    The Pentagon activated its new U.S. ground-based interceptor missile defense system, and officials announced yesterday that any long-range missile launch by North Korea would be considered a "provocative act."

    U.S. sanctions cost North Korea millions
    June 16, 2006
    U.S. economic "defensive measures" aimed at curbing illegal activities by North Korea have cost the Pyongyang regime millions of dollars in lost cash over the past several months through banking restrictions and other actions, U.S. officials estimate.

    Group linked to al Qaeda tightening grip on Somalia
    June 15, 2006
    An Islamist group with ties to al Qaeda is quickly solidifying its grip on parts of Somalia and moving toward setting up a Taliban-style Islamist regime in the country, according to U.S. officials familiar with events in the region.

    Al Qaeda remains threat, officials warn
    June 14, 2006
    Al Qaeda remains a major threat despite the death last week of the terrorist group's leader in Iraq, Abu Musab Zarqawi, U.S. counterterrorism officials told the Senate yesterday.

    Zarqawi death is Islamist setback
    June 9, 2006
    Al Qaeda terrorist leader Abu Musab Zarqawi was a key strategic planner of deadly suicide bombings and gruesome execution-style slayings, and his death is a major setback for Islamist extremists in Iraq and elsewhere, U.S. counterterrorism officials said yesterday.

    N. Korea flag barred on 9 ships
    June 8, 2006
    A Syrian shipping company operates a North Korean-flagged freighter that is owned by one of nine Delaware-based companies, a practice barred last month by U.S. government sanctions that prohibit U.S. firms from flying the North Korean flags on ships.

    China adds new systems to arsenal
    May 24, 2006
    China's secret military buildup includes laser anti-satellite weapons and new long-range nuclear missile systems set for deployment this year, according to the Pentagon's annual report to Congress on the Chinese military.

    U.S.-based vessels can't fly N. Korean flag
    May 23, 2006
    The Bush administration quietly imposed additional economic sanctions on North Korea earlier this month by barring U.S. companies from flying North Korea's flag on freighters, tankers and fishing vessels, some of which are linked to illegal smuggling.

    Officials cool to idea for China military ties
    May 19, 2006
    Several members of Congress oppose an admiral's proposal to ease restrictions on military exchanges with China, a move they say could boost Beijing's forces and runs counter to a policy the Pentagon openly supports.

    Rumsfeld calls border duty Guard test
    May 18, 2006
    Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld told the Senate yesterday that dispatching 6,000 troops to support security efforts on the U.S.-Mexico border will be a test of a recently upgraded National Guard, but will not impede other missions.

    New charges expected in defense data theft ring
    May 16, 2006
    Federal prosecutors are expected to add new charges against several people in Los Angeles linked to a covert program to provide China with Navy defense technology and at least one will be charged with espionage, U.S. government officials said.

    Pakistani nuke supplier tied to Syria
    May 13, 2006
    U.S. intelligence agencies suspect Syria was offered and received nuclear weapons technology from the covert Pakistani supplier group headed by A.Q. Khan, according to an intelligence report.

    Russian military seen in decline
    May 12, 2006
    Russia's military forces have steadily deteriorated since the early 1990s and Moscow is trying to compensate by building up its nuclear forces and commando troops, according to military specialists.

    NATO sees growing threat of missile strike on Europe
    May 11, 2006
    Europe faces a growing threat of ballistic missile attack from rogue states such as Iran and North Korea and needs missile defenses to counter the threats, a NATO report says.

    Intelligence agency's focus turns to spies on the ground
    May 9, 2006
    The Central Intelligence Agency will continue a shift toward developing networks of agents overseas while losing some of its role in analyzing intelligence, Bush administration officials said yesterday.

    Goss quits as CIA chief
    May 6, 2006
    CIA Director Porter J. Goss resigned abruptly yesterday, leaving a post he held for less than two years and becoming the latest high-level administration official to be ensnared in a White House shake-up.

    U.S. 'disrupted' al Qaeda WMD efforts
    May 3, 2006
    U.S. and international programs to defeat al Qaeda have limited the terrorist group's ability to acquire weapons of mass destruction, the No. 2 U.S. intelligence official said.

    U.S., Japan ask China for military transparency
    May 2, 2006
    Senior U.S. and Japanese leaders called on China yesterday to explain its secret military buildup and urged North Korea to return to six-party talks on its nuclear program.

    Japan presses N. Korea to resolve abduction issue
    April 29, 2006
    Japan's government is stepping up pressure on North Korea to help resolve the fate of Japanese nationals abducted by North Korean agents three decades ago, a senior Japanese official said yesterday.

    Hu refuses to back Iran sanctions
    April 27, 2006
    President Bush directly appealed to Chinese President Hu Jintao last week to support economic sanctions on Iran for not abiding by international controls on its nuclear program, but Mr. Hu refused to do so now, Bush administration officials said.

    More muscle, with eye on China
    April 20, 2006
    The Pentagon is engaged in an extensive buildup of military forces in Asia as part of a covert strategy to strengthen and position U.S. and allied forces to deter -- or defeat -- China.

    New U.S. strategy anticipates China as a threat
    April 20, 2006
    The Bush administration has adopted a bold new strategy for countering the emergence of a threatening China with policies that were drawn up several years ago and started being implemented in the past several months.

    China security talks mix with politics, economy
    April 20, 2006
    Deputy Secretary of State Robert B. Zoellick has led three rounds of talks with Chinese leaders as part of a so-called "senior dialogue." He spoke in March with national security reporter Bill Gertz. Excerpts of that discussion:

    Chinese military linked to missile smuggling
    April 20, 2006
    Court papers made public yesterday in the case of a California man who pleaded guilty to trying to smuggle anti-aircraft missiles into the United States show that a Chinese general and state-run manufacturer are linked to the crime.

    CIA mines 'rich' content from blogs
    April 19, 2006
    President Bush and U.S. policy-makers are receiving more intelligence from open sources such as Internet blogs and foreign newspapers than they previously did, senior intelligence officials said.

    Manhunt sidelines bin Laden
    April 18, 2006
    Osama bin Laden and his top deputy remain at large, but the Bush administration's top counterterrorism coordinator says the international manhunt has limited their effectiveness.

    Nuclear warhead update developed
    April 7, 2006
    The Bush administration is designing a new nuclear warhead that will replace aging stockpiles of weapons and counter emerging threats, according to Energy Department officials.

    Pentagon calls Iran missile claim an exaggeration
    April 4, 2006
    Iran tested an older Scud missile variant last week and often exaggerates its military developments, the Pentagon said yesterday in response to Tehran's reported testing of new advanced weaponry.

    China harvesting inmates' organs, journalist says
    March 24, 2006
    A Chinese journalist has uncovered a secret detention center in northern China that is being used by a hospital to harvest human organs for sale to domestic and international buyers.

    Longtime conservative strategist dies
    March 23, 2006
    John E. Carbaugh Jr., a lawyer and conservative activist who played an influential role behind the scenes in Washington politics for three decades, has died. He was 60.

    Pentagon 'hedge' strategy targets China
    March 17, 2006
    The Pentagon is moving strategic bombers to Guam and aircraft carriers and submarines to the Pacific as part of a new "hedge" strategy aimed at preparing for conflict with China, Pentagon officials said yesterday.

    Chinese military trains in West
    March 15, 2006
    China is stepping up military training in Latin America because of a law that limits U.S. military support to nations in the region, the general in charge of the U.S. Southern Command told Congress yesterday.

    Expanded influence seen as Chinese military goal
    March 1, 2006
    China is building up its military -- including nuclear missiles, ships and submarines -- with the apparent goal of expanding its power throughout Asia, senior military intelligence officials told Congress yesterday.

    China proposes missile replacement for Bolivia
    February 27, 2006
    China's communist leaders are advising the new leftist government in Bolivia to avoid upsetting the United States, but at the same time have offered to replace shoulder-fired missiles that a CIA-led operation removed from the South American country last year, U.S. intelligence officials said.

    Security fears about infiltration by terrorists
    February 22, 2006
    Several Bush-administration security officials expressed concerns yesterday that terrorists could infiltrate seaports through a United Arab Emirates company that is vying to manage six U.S. ports.

    Counterspying cut for Energy
    February 21, 2006
    The Energy Department is downgrading its counterintelligence unit in what officials say is a "hostile takeover" by the intelligence office.

    Commercial photos show Chinese nuke buildup
    February 16, 2006
    Commercial satellite photos made public recently provide a new look at China's nuclear forces and bases images that include the first view of a secret underwater submarine tunnel.

    Counterintelligence posts vacant
    February 10, 2006
    The top ranks of government counterintelligence agencies are empty due to resignations and retirements amid a dispute over the role of counterspying, U.S. intelligence officials say.

    China's emergence as military power splits strategists on threat to U.S.
    February 7, 2006
    A new Pentagon strategy report and recent congressional testimony by the director of national intelligence show the Bush administration remains divided on the threat posed by China's rise.

    Intelligence intransigence
    February 5, 2006
    One year after Congress authorized the creation of a czar to oversee and reform intelligence agencies, the CIA, the FBI and other services remain largely the same, bound by ingrained bureaucratic process and culture, intelligence officials say.

    Anti-U.S. terror threat still potent, Negroponte warns
    February 3, 2006
    Al Qaeda terrorism remains the most serious threat to U.S. national security, and the insurgency in Iraq shows no sign of abating, the nation's top intelligence official told the Senate yesterday.

    U.S. agencies find no proof of looming al Qaeda attack
    February 2, 2006
    Despite statements by senior al Qaeda leaders, U.S. intelligence agencies do not have information indicating the group is ready to conduct a major attack, U.S. counterterrorism officials said.

    Nukes pursued in multiple ways
    February 2, 2006
    Iran is building nuclear weapons through both plutonium and enriched uranium as part of a secret development effort, a senior State Department official said yesterday.

    Strategy targets terror WMDs
    January 27, 2006
    The Pentagon's latest four-year strategy report calls for setting up a special military task force to prevent weapons of mass destruction from being transferred to terrorist groups, The Washington Times has learned.

    Simulated attack showcases defense
    January 25, 2006
    The Pentagon showed off its new command-and-control system for U.S. missile defenses yesterday during a war-game missile attack on the United States, Japan and South Korea.

    Ex-official warned against testifying on NSA programs
    January 12, 2006
    The National Security Agency has warned a former intelligence officer that he should not testify to Congress about accusations of illegal activity at NSA because of the secrecy of the programs involved.

    Iran seen as moving toward nuclear weapons
    January 11, 2006
    Iran's resumption of uranium enrichment yesterday will move Tehran closer to full-scale nuclear weapons production, according to U.S. and Western officials and specialists.

    NSA whistleblower asks to testify
    January 5, 2006
    A former National Security Agency official wants to tell Congress about electronic intelligence programs that he asserts were carried out illegally by the NSA and the Defense Intelligence Agency.

    China raps sanctions for Iran arms sales
    December 29, 2005
    China's government yesterday demanded that the Bush administration lift sanctions imposed on six companies on charges of illicit sales to Iran, saying the action undermined Beijing's cooperation with the United States.

    U.S. puts sanctions on Chinese firms for aiding Tehran
    December 27, 2005
    Several Chinese companies involved in selling missile goods and chemical-arms materials to Iran have been hit with U.S. sanctions, Bush administration officials said yesterday.

    Top official fears Patriot Act loss will hurt FBI
    December 19, 2005
    The FBI will lose capabilities used in tracking terrorists if provisions of the USA Patriot Act are allowed to expire, a senior FBI official said.

    Attacks in a lull, but Iraq braces for election violence
    December 13, 2005
    Suicide bombings in Iraq have decreased in recent weeks, but terrorists are suspected of planning major attacks to coincide with the elections Thursday, senior U.S. military officials say.

    U.S. official warns of 'catastrophic' weapons use
    December 11, 2005
    A senior State Department official is warning that terrorists are continuing to seek nuclear, chemical and biological weapons for use in future attacks.

    N. Korea charged in counterfeiting of U.S. currency
    December 2, 2005
    North Korea's government has produced more than $45 million in high-quality fake $100 bills since 1989 and is the world's only state-sponsored producer of the so-called "supernote," according to U.S. law-enforcement officials.

    Defense contractor held in spy case
    November 30, 2005
    A defense contractor charged with failing to register as a Chinese agent admitted passing data on U.S. Navy arms technology to China for 22 years, including information on next-generation destroyers, an aircraft carrier catapult and the Aegis weapons system, according to new court papers in the case.

    U.S. says Tehran is pursuing nuke arms
    November 25, 2005
    U.S. intelligence agencies are convinced that Iran is working to build nuclear weapons in secret based on a confidential report produced last week by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and on information from a former Iranian opposition figure.

    U.S. seen vulnerable to space 'pulse' attack
    November 22, 2005
    The United States is highly vulnerable to attack from electronic pulses caused by a nuclear blast in space, according to a new book on threats to U.S. security.

    Russian warhead alters course midflight in test
    November 21, 2005
    Russia recently conducted a flight test of a new warhead that can change course in midflight, which U.S. and Russian officials are calling part of Moscow's efforts to defeat U.S. missile defenses.

    Trio held in L.A. as spies for Beijing
    November 17, 2005
    A Chinese intelligence-gathering ring in Los Angeles provided Beijing's military with details of a new small U.S. unmanned aerial vehicle, along with some of the U.S. military's most advanced high-technology weapons data, according to Bush administration officials close to the case.

    Irish forgery suspect fights U.S. extradition
    November 17, 2005
    An Irish communist leader wanted in the United States on counterfeiting charges has fled Northern Ireland to avoid extradition.

    2 charged with conspiracy to import Chinese missiles
    November 10, 2005
    Two men were indicted yesterday in Los Angeles on charges of attempting to illegally import Chinese shoulder-fired missiles into the United States.

    Report hits China over N. Korea role
    November 10, 2005
    China has failed to use political and economic leverage to press North Korea into giving up its nuclear program, a congressional commission says.

    Islamists see opportunity with unrest in France
    November 9, 2005
    Street riots in France do not appear to be instigated by overseas terrorists, but there are growing fears that Islamic extremists are exploiting the unrest, U.S. officials and private specialists said.

    Four arrests linked to Chinese spy ring
    November 5, 2005
    Four persons arrested in Los Angeles are part of a Chinese intelligence-gathering ring, federal investigators said, and the suspects caused serious compromises for 15 years to major U.S. weapons systems, including submarines and warships.

    Activists help sow seeds of democracy in Stalinist N. Korea
    October 28, 2005
    ULAN BAT0R, Mongolia -- Nongovernmental organizations from Mongolia are working quietly with North Korea's totalitarians to help bring democracy to the Stalinist state, said Mongolian President Nambaryn Enkhbayar.

    U.S. intelligence needs to be more 'agile,' report says
    October 27, 2005
    U.S. intelligence agencies need to be more "agile" than their enemies to deal with current terrorist and other threats, according to a strategy report made public yesterday.

    Chinese exporter linked to missile scheme
    October 26, 2005
    Federal investigators have linked a Chinese state-run export company to a conspiracy to sell surface-to-air missiles in the United States, Justice Department officials said.

    Lithuanians remember atrocities by KGB
    October 24, 2005
    VILNIUS, Lithuania -- The dreaded KGB Soviet secret political police is remembered here by thousands of people who visit a special museum designed to help Lithuanians know about the arrests, torture and deportation of their countrymen under Moscow's rule.

    Rumsfeld wary of Beijing's buildup
    October 20, 2005
    BEIJING -- Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld told Chinese military officials today that China's expansion of its strategic missile forces and a lack of information about the buildup is a concern to the United States and other nations.

    China rejects Western democracy
    October 20, 2005
    BEIJING -- China's government yesterday issued a report stating why the Marxist system will not be changed to allow for Western-style democracy and why democracy is limited to within the ruling Communist Party dictatorship.

    China denies targeting U.S. cities
    October 19, 2005
    BEIJING -- China's strategic missile forces commander today told Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld that China is not targeting U.S. cities with missiles and will not be the first to use nuclear arms in a conflict.

    Rumsfeld's lesson for China students: Democracy growing
    October 19, 2005
    BEIJING -- Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld told students and faculty at a Communist Party school here today that openness, democracy and freedom are the keys to China's future.

    China's military center off-limits
    October 15, 2005
    China's central military command center will remain off-limits to Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld when he visits China next week, defense officials said yesterday.

    China expected to put on the charm for Rumsfeld
    October 14, 2005
    China's government is planning a charm offensive aimed at reversing Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld's view that China could emerge as a threat.

    Iranian militants in power stir fears
    October 14, 2005
    The rise of militants to power positions in Iran is raising new worries about Iranian military forces' deploying new weapons that threaten oil supplies or future long-range nuclear or chemical missile strikes.

    Covert action operations to remain in CIA's control
    October 14, 2005
    The CIA has retained control over U.S. covert action paramilitary programs despite a commission recommendation that the Pentagon take the lead role in such programs, senior U.S. intelligence officials said yesterday.

    U.S. accuses North Korea of $100 bill counterfeiting
    October 12, 2005
    The Bush administration formally has accused North Korea of manufacturing high-quality counterfeit $100 "supernotes" for the first time, according to an indictment made public yesterday as part of a 16-year probe.

    Irish Workers Party leader faces charges in U.S.
    October 11, 2005
    The leader of the Marxist arm of the Official Irish Republican Army has been arrested in Northern Ireland and is being sought by U.S. authorities for his involvement in a North Korean government program to make high-quality counterfeit $100 bills known as "supernotes."

    Vetting faulted in FBI spy case
    October 7, 2005
    Poor vetting procedures by the FBI and Marine Corps are being blamed for the compromise of intelligence secrets to the Philippines by a former Marine who worked in the White House, U.S. officials say.

    Castro brothers helped KGB, files show
    October 6, 2005
    Soviet intelligence files made public in a new book show that American travelers to Cuba helped KGB agents obtain identity documents and that Fidel Castro and his brother worked with the spy agency five years before taking power in the 1959 revolution.

    China a 'central' spying threat
    September 29, 2005
    China's intelligence services are mounting wide-ranging efforts to acquire U.S. technology and are among the most active of nearly 100 nations whose spying has undermined U.S. military advantages, according to a senior U.S. counterintelligence official.

    CIA chief placing more spies abroad
    September 24, 2005

    The CIA is working to improve overseas spying through more high-risk operations and less reliance on foreign intelligence services, according to CIA Director Porter J. Goss.

    U.S. deploys warfare unit to jam enemy satellites
    September 22, 2005
    The U.S. military is bracing for future attacks in space, and the Air Force has deployed an electronic-warfare unit capable of jamming enemy satellites, the general in charge of space defenses says.

    Atta files destroyed by Pentagon
    September 22, 2005
    Pentagon lawyers during the Clinton administration ordered the destruction of intelligence reports that identified September 11 leader Mohamed Atta months before the attacks on the Pentagon and World Trade Center, according to congressional testimony yesterday.

    Taiwan slammed on lax defense
    September 20, 2005
    A senior Pentagon official yesterday sharply criticized Taiwan's government for not moving ahead with an arms buildup to counter a mounting threat from China.

    U.S. report says Iran seeks to acquire nuclear
    weapons September 16, 2005
    Iran is concealing many of its nuclear facilities from international controls and the activities show it is seeking nuclear weapons, according to a U.S. government report.

    Top CIA official to quit sooner over Goss dispute
    September 15, 2005
    A senior official in the CIA's espionage branch will leave earlier than announced because of a dispute with CIA Director Porter J. Goss on reforms within the agency's spying branch, Bush administration officials said yesterday.

    China sought system to intercept U.S. spy data
    September 12, 2005
    China's government secretly tried to buy U.S. electronic equipment that would allow Beijing to intercept U.S. intelligence data sent to the ground by satellites, according to court papers in a spy case.

    No 'evidence' of Gulf War pilot's death
    September 9, 2005
    The Navy announced yesterday it still thinks Persian Gulf War pilot Capt. Michael "Scott" Speicher could be alive and thus will not change his status from "missing/captured" to "killed in action."

    China in a tiff at missile defense
    September 2, 2005
    China's government issued a report yesterday criticizing the development of regional missile defenses in Asia and opposing U.S. efforts to help Taiwan counter Beijing's missiles targeting the island.

    Chinese activist warns of nuclear war
    September 1, 2005
    China is preparing for nuclear war with the United States over Taiwan, and a conflict is likely in the near future because of divisions among Beijing's leaders, a Chinese democracy activist says.

    Hill panel hit for going soft on China issues
    August 24, 2005
    A bipartisan congressional commission on China has been taken over by Democrats and stopped work on most issues related to Beijing's military, a public watchdog group said.

    Rumsfeld says Iran is arming Iraqi insurgents
    August 20, 2005
    Iran is continuing to supply weapons to insurgents in Iraq with the goal of creating an Islamist government, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said.

    War games seen as 'message'
    August 17, 2005
    A joint Chinese and Russian military exercise set to begin tomorrow is meant as a political signal to the United States, in addition to helping Moscow showcase its weapons for sale to China, U.S. defense and intelligence officials said yesterday.

    U.S. to restart arms technology transfers to Israel
    August 17, 2005
    The Pentagon yesterday announced it will resume arms technology transfers to Israel that were curbed as a result of Tel Aviv's weapons sales to China.

    China stocks nukes as anti-U.S. tactic
    July 29, 2005
    China is building up its nuclear forces as part of a secret strategy targeting the United States, according to a former Chinese diplomat.

    Chinese military buildup reaches beyond Taiwan
    July 20, 2005
    China is rapidly building up its military forces and weapons systems to project power beyond Taiwan, according to a Pentagon report made public yesterday.

    N. Korea defector seeks help from Bush
    July 19, 2005
    A North Korean defector who survived 10 years in a prison labor camp said he told President Bush last month that the United States should do more to help those who flee the communist regime.

    Chinese general shakes nukes at U.S.
    July 16, 2005
    A senior general in the Chinese army threatened to use nuclear arms against the United States in a conflict over the Taiwan Strait, prompting the Bush administration to call the remarks "highly irresponsible."

    London attacks raise specter of more bombings
    July 14, 2005
    Terrorist bombings in Madrid and Istanbul and the discovery of a wider conspiracy in the London blasts are raising fears of another round of bombings, U.S. officials said yesterday.

    Bush backs Rove amid CIA leak scandal
    July 13, 2005
    President Bush continues to have confidence in Karl Rove, the presidential adviser at the center of a press frenzy over the ongoing Justice Department investigation into a leak that divulged the name of a CIA officer, the White House said yesterday.

    Pakistan arrest offered hints, no details on planned hits
    July 8, 2005
    The recent arrest of an al Qaeda terrorist in Pakistan provided some clues that terrorists were planning attacks on trains and buses, but there were no specific warnings of the bombings in London yesterday, U.S. officials said.

    China's buildup causing 'concern'
    June 30, 2005
    The Pentagon is debating how to field the right mix of weapons to deal with China's growing military power, a top Air Force general said yesterday.

    New U.S. center to check spread of WMDs
    June 29, 2005
    The Bush administration has agreed to set up a new interagency center to counter the spread of weapons of mass destruction, U.S. officials said.

    Beijing devoted to weakening 'enemy' U.S., defector says
    June 27, 2005
    China's communist leaders view the United States as their main enemy and are working in Asia and around the world to undermine U.S. alliances, said a former Chinese diplomat.

    Thefts of U.S. technology boost China's weaponry
    June 27, 2005
    Part II
    China is stepping up its overt and covert efforts to gather intelligence and technology in the United States, and the activities have boosted Beijing's plans to rapidly produce advanced-weapons systems.

    Chinese technology theft on the rise, U.S. says
    June 27, 2005
    U.S. government investigators say the number of cases involving China and its middlemen who have illegally obtained sensitive or classified U.S. weapons technology is growing.

    Beijing building deep-sea naval might
    June 26, 2005
    China soon will receive a new Kilo submarine from Russia, part of a naval buildup of modern warships and submarines that has triggered new fears for U.S. military planners.

    Chinese dragon awakens
    June 26, 2005
    Part I
    China is building its military forces faster than U.S. intelligence and military analysts expected, prompting fears that Beijing will attack Taiwan in the next two years, according to Pentagon officials.

    China advances missile program
    June 22, 2005
    China has successfully flight-tested a submarine-launched missile that U.S. officials say marks a major advance in Beijing's long-range nuclear program.

    Pentagon cuts back on weapons to Israel
    June 21, 2005
    The Pentagon has sharply curtailed weapons-technology transfers to Israel as part of a dispute over Israel's arms sales to China, according to Department of Defense officials.

    U.S. probes reported Sudan link to terror
    June 17, 2005
    U.S. intelligence and security agencies are investigating reports that Sudan's government has renewed its covert support for al Qaeda and other Islamic terrorists, The Washington Times has learned.

    Analysts missed Chinese buildup
    June 9, 2005
    A highly classified intelligence report produced for the new director of national intelligence concludes that U.S. spy agencies failed to recognize several key military developments in China in the past decade, The Washington Times has learned.

    Rice expresses concern about China's military
    June 7, 2005
    Senior Bush administration officials are expressing growing fears over the rapid pace of China's military buildup.

    Foreign spying in 2004 impaired U.S. military edge
    June 1, 2005
    Foreign spies from nearly 100 nations sought sensitive U.S. technology last year, and technology losses undermined U.S. military advantages, according to an annual U.S. counterintelligence report.

    33 U.S. bases chosen for closing
    May 14, 2005
    The Pentagon yesterday announced plans to close 33 major military bases and realign 29 others in a force restructuring designed to consolidate forces and save money at least $49 billion over 20 years.

    Pentagon to suggest forces share facilities at some bases
    May 12, 2005
    The Pentagon will recommend joining elements of different branches of the armed services on some military bases when it announces proposed base closings in upcoming days, defense officials say.

    Intelligence chief picks 4 top deputies
    May 7, 2005
    The United States' first director of national intelligence, John D. Negroponte, has appointed four deputies from within the intelligence and foreign policy bureaucracy, drawing fire from reform advocates.

    Capture seen as path to bin Laden
    May 6, 2005
    The arrest of al Qaeda's No. 3 man, Abu Farraj al-Libbi, in Pakistan promises to provide new information on Osama bin Laden's life on the run and deprives the terror network of its chief operating officer, according to counterterrorism and defense officials.

    Japanese seek U.S. support on sanctions
    May 3, 2005
    Representatives of Japanese nationals abducted by North Korea have appealed to the Bush administration to support sanctions on Pyongyang until the communist regime provides a full accounting of the missing Japanese.

    Wolfowitz holds talks with top Chinese general
    April 29, 2005
    Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz met yesterday with a top Chinese general and other military officials amid growing concern over the rapid buildup of Chinese military forces.

    Myers says U.S. winning in Iraq
    April 27, 2005
    The chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said yesterday that U.S. and allied forces in Iraq are winning the war against former Saddam Hussein loyalists, foreign terrorists and criminals.

    Taiwan needs weapons to counter China buildup
    April 26, 2005
    Taiwan urgently needs to buy submarines, missile defenses and patrol aircraft to counter the growing threat posed by China's rapid buildup of military forces, a former Pentagon China specialist says.

    North Korea seen readying its first nuclear arms test
    April 23, 2005
    U.S. intelligence agencies have detected activity at facilities in North Korea indicating Pyongyang may be preparing to conduct its first nuclear test in the near future, according to U.S. officials.

    Reports reveal Zarqawi nuclear threat
    April 20, 2005
    Recurrent intelligence reports say al Qaeda terrorist Abu Musab Zarqawi has obtained a nuclear device or is preparing a radiological explosive -- or dirty bomb -- for an attack, according to U.S. officials, who also say analysts are unable to gauge the reliability of the information's sources.

    Negroponte would stress reform
    April 13, 2005
    The career diplomat nominated to the new post of director of national intelligence told the Senate yesterday he would make reforming spy agencies a major priority.

    GAO faults relaxed arms-export controls
    April 7, 2005
    The State Department is continuing to loosen strategic trade controls even as U.S. adversaries are increasing efforts to illegally obtain weapons and related technology, according to a congressional report to be made public today.

    Missiles sold to China and Iran
    April 6, 2005
    Members of Ukraine's intelligence service and two Russians took part in an elaborate plan to sell 20 long-range cruise missiles to China and Iran, according to a Ukrainian government official.

    Panel to review war pilot's status
    April 5, 2005
    Navy Secretary Gordon England has ordered a special panel to review the status of Navy Capt. Michael Scott Speicher, the pilot declared killed in combat in 1991 but later classified as captured during the Persian Gulf War.

    Major milestone' reached in missile defense system
    April 5, 2005
    The Pentagon announced yesterday the completion of a new high-powered radar that is a key element of the U.S. ground-based missile defense system.

    Berger pleads guilty to theft of classified Archives papers
    April 2, 2005
    The Clinton administration's most senior national security official pleaded guilty yesterday to stealing classified documents from the National Archives and destroying with scissors some of the material related to terror threats before the 2000 celebration.

    Panel urges Bush to set up FBI intelligence branch
    April 1, 2005
    A presidential panel yesterday urged the Bush administration to set up a new domestic intelligence branch of the FBI to better deal with terrorism, spies and arms proliferation.

    Panel faults prewar intelligence
    March 31, 2005
    President Bush is expected to embrace recommendations from his commission on weapons of mass destruction, which will release a report today calling on the U.S. intelligence community to ensure that dissenting views within its agencies are fully reviewed and passed up the chain of command.

    Pakistan denies access to nuke supplier
    March 30, 2005
    Pakistan will not grant U.S. requests for direct access to pardoned nuclear supplier Abdul Qadeer Khan, but instead offered alternatives for getting information about his covert network, Pakistan's ambassador told the United States yesterday.

    Bush approves tough new plan to battle spies
    March 29, 2005
    Nearly 80 Americans have been caught spying since 1985, and the Bush administration has launched a more aggressive anti-spying effort to better combat foreign intelligence activities, according to a new strategy report made public yesterday.

    Plan eyes spies near battlefield
    March 24, 2005
    A plan to reform defense-related intelligence calls for moving more spies and analysts out of the Pentagon and closer to the battlefield to better support troops, Pentagon officials said yesterday.

    Syria, Iran aiding Iraq insurgents
    March 10, 2005
    CIA Director Porter J. Goss told Congress yesterday that the governments of Syria and Iran are helping insurgents in Iraq, despite U.S. efforts to end the cooperation.

    Pentagon sees missile-defense progress
    March 10, 2005
    U.S. defenses against enemy missiles are progressing toward full deployment and a new sea-based version hit a simulated Scud missile flight during a test last month, Pentagon officials said yesterday.

    U.S. calls new Chinese law on Taiwan 'unhelpful'
    March 9, 2005
    China disclosed the first details of a new law on secession yesterday that authorizes an attack on Taiwan if it formally declares independence, as the Bush administration said the measure will raise tensions and increase the risk of war.

    U.S. targets spy services abroad
    March 6, 2005
    COLLEGE STATION, Texas -- The Bush administration has adopted a new counterintelligence strategy that calls for "attacking" foreign spy services and the spy components of terrorist groups before they can strike, a senior U.S. intelligence official said yesterday.

    Bin Laden urges Zarqawi to attack inside America
    March 1, 2005
    U.S. intelligence and security officials yesterday said new information indicates that al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden has asked Iraq-based terrorists to focus future attacks on targets inside the United States.

    Bush, Putin agree to act to prevent nuclear terrorism
    February 25, 2005
    President Bush and Russian President Vladimir Putin agreed yesterday to step up cooperation in securing weapons and material to prevent nuclear terrorism.

    Bush warns of China arms sales
    February 23, 2005
    President Bush yesterday expressed "deep concern" that the European Union is planning to lift its arms embargo against China, suggesting that Beijing might use new weaponry against Taiwan, a move that could pose a threat to U.S. forces and other countries in the region.

    Security access denial at issue
    February 20, 2005
    U.S. intelligence agencies are abusing rules on access to classified data to punish employees who upset security officials or who go against prevailing bureaucratic viewpoints, according to three officials who say they were unfairly forced out.

    Chinese military buildup assessed as threat to U.S.
    February 18, 2005
    China's military buildup is "tilting the balance of power in the Taiwan Strait" in ways threatening to the United States, say U.S. intelligence officials, whose blunt comments contrast sharply to past intelligence assessments of the communist country's capabilities.

    Goss fears WMD attack in U.S. 'a matter of time'
    February 17, 2005
    Senior U.S. intelligence leaders told Congress yesterday that "it may only be a matter of time" before terrorists try to use weapons of mass destruction against the United States.

    EU urged to maintain arms ban
    February 10, 2005
    The Bush administration is pressing the European Union to maintain the arms embargo imposed on China after the 1989 military crackdown on pro-democracy protesters in Beijing.

    Rumsfeld to visit China, eyes hot line for defense
    February 9, 2005
    Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld has agreed to visit China this year and the Pentagon is discussing the creation of a telephone hot line to the Chinese military, Pentagon officials said yesterday.

    Defense seeks raise, rock-penetrating nuke
    February 8, 2005
    The Pentagon is seeking $419.3 billion for fiscal 2006, a 4.8 percent increase, and wants to renew work on a rock-penetrating nuclear bomb that could be used against underground bunkers in places such as Iran and North Korea.

    Vote 'tipping' support for government in Iraq
    February 4, 2005
    Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said yesterday that Sunday's historic elections in Iraq have ignited a "tipping of support for the government" by Iraqis now more willing to help security forces defeat insurgents.

    Analysis links N. Korea to Libyan nuclear goods
    February 3, 2005
    U.S. intelligence analysis of nuclear weapons-related goods obtained from Libya has linked it to North Korea, a sign the communist regime's weapons program is more advanced than previously suspected.

    Conversions of jetliners in China draw attention
    February 1, 2005
    The Bush administration is investigating whether China illegally converted Boeing commercial jetliners into a military surveillance aircraft in violation of U.S. export laws.

    IBM sale to China raises concern
    January 26, 2005
    Three House committee chairmen asked the Bush administration yesterday to review the proposed sale of IBM's personal computer unit to a Chinese-owned company.

    Missiles deployed for inauguration
    January 19, 2005
    The military has deployed anti-aircraft missiles within range of the Capitol as part of security enhancements for tomorrow's presidential inauguration.

    China builds up strategic sea lanes
    January 18, 2005
    China is building up military forces and setting up bases along sea lanes from the Middle East to project its power overseas and protect its oil shipments, according to a previously undisclosed internal report prepared for Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld.

    Attacks by Islamists projected to continue
    January 14, 2005
    Radical Islamic terrorists will continue to attack the United States and the world in the coming two decades and are likely to obtain and use biological weapons, according to a new intelligence report made public yesterday.

    WMD panel fires FBI agent for sharing CIA document
    January 13, 2005
    A presidential commission examining U.S. intelligence failures related to weapons of mass destruction has fired an FBI agent for improperly supplying a classified CIA report to FBI headquarters, The Washington Times has learned.

    Pentagon ousts official who tied Russia, Iraq arms
    December 30, 2004
    A Pentagon official who publicly disclosed information showing Russian involvement in moving Iraqi weapons out of that country has been dismissed.

    U.S. calls for calm from Beijing, Taipei
    December 29, 2004
    Secretary of State Colin L. Powell yesterday cautioned China and Taiwan not to escalate tensions as Beijing issued a report warning that its military will "crush" the island if it formally declares independence from the mainland.

    Fight on WMDs boasts global backing
    December 23, 2004
    The war in Iraq has set the United States at odds with some allies, but the international community is strongly supporting a U.S.-led initiative to stop the spread of weapons of mass destruction.

    Commander says Syria must curb terrorist support
    December 17, 2004
    The commander of U.S. forces in Iraq said yesterday that Syria's government must do more to curb support for terrorists and former Saddam Hussein loyalists in Iraq who are using the Arab state as a base.

    N. Korea insists on change of U.S. policy for new talks
    December 16, 2004
    North Korea is waiting for President Bush to offer a more friendly U.S. policy toward the communist state in his upcoming speeches before agreeing to resume stalled nuclear talks, Bush administration officials say.

    Former FBI agent cites penetration of CIA by China
    December 15, 2004
    China's intelligence service spent years training a spy who posed as a Catholic priest in New York and was part of an escape plan for a Chinese agent in the CIA, according to a veteran FBI counterspy.

    Foreign terrorists in Fallujah
    December 14, 2004
    U.S. military forces captured more than 30 foreign fighters during recent combat in Fallujah and found equipment used by terrorists to make fake passports and documents, a senior military official in Iraq said.

    From the ground up
    December 12, 2004
    Two years after the demise of the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty, the United States has put into place a limited system to defend the country from missile attacks. It is the first system of its kind to protect all 50 states from missile attack, on a limited scale.

    Deployment generates interest, little opposition
    December 12, 2004
    Deployment of the first U.S. national missile defense has produced little domestic or international opposition. In fact, there is growing interest among other nations in taking part in buying or cooperating in U.S. efforts to knock down enemy missiles and warheads.

    China tests ballistic missile submarine
    December 3, 2004
    China's military has launched the first of a new class of ballistic missile submarines in what defense officials view as a major step forward in Beijing's strategic weapons program.

    U.S. told of Iranian effort to create nuclear warhead
    December 2, 2004
    Recent intelligence shows Iran has been working to produce a missile re-entry vehicle containing a small nuclear warhead for its Shahab missiles and has encountered problems developing a reliable centrifuge system for uranium enrichment, U.S. officials said.

    Iraqi bomb labs signal attacks in the works
    November 30, 2004
    Chemicals and bomb-making literature found at two houses in Fallujah, Iraq, last week show Iraqi rebels are prepared to use chemical and biological weapons in future attacks, a U.S. military spokesman said yesterday.

    CIA report cites N. Korean proliferation threat
    November 26, 2004
    North Korea threatened in secret talks to export nuclear weapons and to conduct a test blast, according to a CIA report made public this week.

    Goss pushes change at CIA
    November 19, 2004
    CIA Director Porter J. Goss is moving ahead with a shake-up at the agency, aimed at changing an outdated and risk-averse spying bureaucracy, according to U.S. intelligence officials.

    Bank lapses cited in Iraq oil program
    November 18, 2004
    The French bank that handled funds for the U.N. oil-for-food program in Iraq made tens of millions of dollars in fees and did not properly monitor transactions involving Saddam Hussein's oil sales, congressional investigators said yesterday.

    U.N. deserted leads in oil-for-food investigation
    November 17, 2004
    A private intelligence firm hired by the United Nations to look into corruption in the oil-for-food program provided valuable leads to U.N. investigators, but they were ignored, the company's director says.

    Saddam oil-food gains doubled
    November 16, 2004
    The Iraqi government of Saddam Hussein skimmed $21.3 billion from the United Nations oil-for-food program, nearly twice the amount of previous U.S. estimates, according to a Senate investigation.

    4 European firms key to Iraq probe
    November 11, 2004
    U.N. legal advisers deliberated yesterday about whether to release four European companies from confidentiality agreements that prohibit them from cooperating with a congressional investigation in the oil-for-food program scandal.

    Coalition uses divide-conquer plan in Fallujah
    November 9, 2004
    Coalition troops are employing a divide-and-conquer strategy in Fallujah, Iraq, capitalizing on months of pinpointed intelligence to seal off terrorist-held neighborhoods and then attack enemy pockets.

    2 Russian generals given awards in Iraq on war eve
    October 30, 2004
    Two Russian generals were photographed receiving awards from Saddam Hussein's government for helping Iraqi military forces less than 10 days before the U.S.-led invasion.

    Pentagon accounts for some explosives
    October 30, 2004
    The Pentagon yesterday said U.S. Army troops removed an estimated 250 tons of ammunition, including plastic explosives, from the Al-Qaqaa weapons storage site in Iraq weeks after the war began.

    Photos point to removal of weapons
    October 29, 2004
    U.S. intelligence agencies have obtained satellite photographs of truck convoys that were at several weapons sites in Iraq in the weeks before U.S. military operations were launched, defense officials said yesterday.

    Russia tied to Iraq's missing arms
    October 28, 2004
    Russian special forces troops moved many of Saddam Hussein's weapons and related goods out of Iraq and into Syria in the weeks before the March 2003 U.S. military operation, The Washington Times has learned.

    Indian scientists sanctioned for assisting Iran on nukes
    October 22, 2004
    The Bush administration has imposed sanctions on two Indian scientists for selling nuclear technology to Iran and is planning additional arms-related sanctions, U.S. officials said.

    Pentagon probes punishment of whistleblower
    October 21, 2004
    The Pentagon is investigating the National Security Agency for improperly punishing an official after he reported he suspected a co-worker was a Chinese agent in the Defense Intelligence Agency.

    CIA backs away from Al Qaeda tip
    October 20, 2004
    A CIA informant provided false information about an impending al Qaeda attack, but other intelligence sources reveal that the danger of a major strike by the group close to the upcoming elections is real, U.S. officials said.

    Chechen terrorists probed
    October 13, 2004
    U.S. security officials are investigating a recent intelligence report that a group of 25 Chechen terrorists illegally entered the United States from Mexico in July.

    Chinese information warfare threatens Taiwan
    October 13, 2004
    Taiwan is facing a growing threat from Chinese computer attacks and other information-based strikes designed to cripple its infrastructures, a senior Pentagon official says.

    Saddam bribed China with oil deals, CIA finds
    October 12, 2004
    China illegally supplied Saddam Hussein's regime with missile technology and other weaponry and was a major beneficiary of the U.N. oil-for-food program, according to a CIA report.

    Saddam paid off French leaders
    October 7, 2004
    Saddam Hussein used a U.N. humanitarian program to pay $1.78 billion to French government officials, businessmen and journalists in a bid to have sanctions removed and U.S. policies opposed, according to a CIA report made public yesterday.

    Allies 'resisted' stopping oil ploy
    October 6, 2004
    The governments of France, Russia, China and Syria blocked U.S. efforts within the United Nations to stop Saddam Hussein from misusing the oil-for-food program, a State Department official told Congress yesterday.

    Saddam misused oil-food program
    October 5, 2004
    Congressional investigators have uncovered new information showing how Saddam Hussein's government systematically purchased military-related goods for the seven years of the U.N. oil-for-food program.

    Laser injures Delta pilot's eye
    September 29, 2004
    A pilot flying a Delta Air Lines jet was injured by a laser that illuminated the cockpit of the aircraft as it approached Salt Lake City International Airport last week, U.S. officials said.

    N.Y. man disappears after threats to Bush
    September 28, 2004
    U.S. law enforcement officials have been unable to locate an upstate New York man wanted for questioning regarding threats to President Bush.

    U.S. firm fined $6.3 million for Iran trade
    September 25, 2004
    Federal prosecutors completed a plea agreement this week that imposed more than $6.3 million in fines on a U.S. company that illegally sent embargoed high-technology pumps to Iran.

    Iraq's leader appeals to U.N.
    September 25, 2004
    Iraqi Prime Minister Iyad Allawi appealed to the world leaders at the United Nations yesterday to help his country achieve stability by sending peacekeepers, reinforcing borders and forgiving its debts.

    Navy turns down appeal for award
    September 24, 2004
    The Navy has rejected an appeal from the Pentagon inspector general to award a Purple Heart to a Navy intelligence officer who was injured by a laser during a 1997 encounter with a Russian merchant ship spying on a U.S. submarine.

    Company pleads to illegally selling pumps to Iran
    September 23, 2004
    The U.S. subsidiary of a Japanese company will plead guilty to illegally shipping high-technology pumps with military applications to Iran through two French companies, The Washington Times has learned.

    Al Qaeda seen planning for 'spectacular' attack
    September 21, 2004
    U.S. intelligence agencies concluded recently that al Qaeda fearing its credibility is on the line is moving ahead with plans for a major, "spectacular" attack, despite disruptions of some operations by recent arrests in Britain and Pakistan.

    Secretary issues warning on intelligence reform
    September 8, 2004
    Hasty reform of U.S. intelligence agencies in the aftermath of the September 11 commission's report could damage American national security, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said yesterday.

    China will send troops to Haiti
    Sept. 6, 2004
    China's Public Security Ministry is set to dispatch a 130-man "special police" unit to Haiti this month in the first deployment of Chinese forces to the Western Hemisphere, Bush administration officials say.

    FBI suspect specialized in Iranian affairs
    Sept 1, 2004
    The Pentagon analyst at the center of an FBI investigation involving classified information being given to Israel is a career civil servant who specialized in Iranian affairs within the policy branch of the Office of the Secretary of Defense under Donald H. Rumsfeld.

    Pentagon briefed on probe
    Aug. 31, 2004
    Two senior Pentagon officials were briefed Sunday on the investigation of a midlevel analyst suspected of passing classified information to Israel, U.S. officials said yesterday.

    Pentagon aide draws scrutiny from FBI
    Aug. 28, 2004
    The FBI is investigating a senior Pentagon official who is suspected of passing classified information to the Israeli government through a pro-Israel lobbying group, U.S. officials said yesterday.

    Two reports detail Iraq prison abuse
    Aug. 27, 2004
    The release of two Pentagon reports this week on prisoner abuses in Iraq is part of ongoing inquiries into the activities of soldiers at Abu Ghraib who mistreated Iraqi prisoners.

    27 tied to Iraq prisoner abuses
    Aug. 26, 2004
    An Army report into military intelligence activities at Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison reveals that 27 soldiers or civilians abused Iraqi prisoners due to criminal activity or confusing interrogation rules.

    Panel blames 'confusion' for Iraqi prison abuse
    Aug. 25, 2004
    Confused interrogation rules and Pentagon leadership failures contributed to the abuse of prisoners at Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison, but the abuse was not the result of approved military policies, says a blue ribbon panel of defense specialists.

    China breaks vow on halting arms transfers
    August 23, 2004
    A Chinese company recently supplied missile-related technology to Iran in violation of Beijing's promises to curb arms-proliferation activities, U.S. intelligence officials say.

    Bin Laden hints major assassination
    August 11, 2004
    U.S. intelligence officials say a high-profile political assassination, triggered by the public release of a new message from Osama bin Laden, will lead off the next major al Qaeda terrorist attack, The Washington Times has learned.

    North Korea pumps money into military
    Aug. 3, 2004
    SEOUL North Korea is spending as much as 40 percent of its gross domestic product on its military, including its nuclear-weapons program, to give its 1.2-million-man army key advantages over better-armed U.S. and South Korean forces, said Army Gen. Leon J. LaPorte, the U.S. Forces Korea commander.

    Transfers 'ready to fight' in Iraq
    August 1, 2004
    SEOUL The commander of U.S. soldiers leaving here for Iraq says they are "ready to fight" insurgents and terrorists despite their initial training for a far different mission in a far different place.

    CIA points to continuing Iran tie to al Qaeda
    July 23, 2004
    A senior CIA official has revealed that al Qaeda operatives in Iran probably had advance knowledge of recent terrorist attacks, a sign that the cooperation between Tehran and al Qaeda is continuing since September 11.

    CIA officer named prior to column
    July 23, 2004
    The identity of CIA officer Valerie Plame was compromised twice before her name appeared in a news column that triggered a federal illegal-disclosure investigation, U.S. officials say.

    Report lists three main changes
    July 22, 2004
    The commission investigating the September 11 terrorist attacks is recommending the creation of a sub-Cabinet chief of national intelligence, a joint counterterrorism center and strengthened congressional oversight of spy agencies, say U.S. officials familiar with the report.

    Chinese produce new type of sub
    July 16, 2004
    China's naval buildup has produced a new type of attack submarine that U.S. intelligence did not know was under construction, according to U.S. defense and intelligence officials.

    Signal jamming a factor in future wars, general says
    July 16, 2004
    Saddam Hussein's failed attempt to jam U.S. Global Positioning System navigation signals during the Iraq war is an example of the growing danger of space warfare, the Air Force's top space commander said yesterday.

    British report links al Qaeda, Baghdad
    July 15, 2004
    A British government report made public yesterday provides new information showing that al Qaeda terrorists had contacts with Iraqi intelligence in developing chemical arms and that the group worked with a Pakistani nuclear weapons scientist.

    Chinese told U.S. arms sales to Taiwan to proceed
    July 14, 2004
    The United States will sell arms to the Republic of China (Taiwan), despite Beijing's objections, because of the growing Chinese missile buildup opposite the island, senior Bush administration officials said yesterday.

    Menges dead at 64; was Reagan adviser
    July 13, 2004
    Constantine C. Menges, a national security and intelligence official during the Reagan administration and advocate of global democracy, died Sunday. He was 64.

    Iraq probing cell phone deals
    July 8, 2004
    The new Iraqi government is investigating whether illegal payoffs were made to secure cell phone contracts for a financial associate of Saddam Hussein, said the former U.S. administrator in Iraq.

    Bremer labels Zarqawi cells hard to crack
    July 2, 2004
    Abu Musab Zarqawi has set up a network so well organized in Iraq it deployed a Yemeni suicide bomber in a car to blow up a police station just 48 hours after he entered the country, says L. Paul Bremer, the former top U.S. administrator in Baghdad.

    Government on alert for July 4 terrorist attack
    June 30, 2004
    U.S. intelligence agencies are warning the federal government to be on alert for a terrorist attack around the July Fourth holiday, especially at military facilities and large gatherings, according to U.S. officials.

    Zarqawi uses Web for funding, recruits
    June 29, 2004
    Abu Musab Zarqawi is using the Internet to recruit more terrorists and get money to finance his insurgency against the U.S.-led coalition in Iraq, according to a senior coalition military official.

    Pyongyang takes a hard line at six-way talks
    June 26, 2004
    North Korea's threat to test nuclear weapons unless the United States makes concessions at the six-party talks is being viewed with worry by the Bush administration.

    Iraqi insurgents seek Saddam's chemical arms
    June 25, 2004
    Insurgents in Iraq are seeking chemical arms and expertise left over from the regime of Saddam Hussein for possible use against U.S. and allied troops, an intelligence official in Iraq said yesterday.

    Pentagon urges repeal of Iraq phone contracts
    June 22, 2004
    The Pentagon has asked the Coalition Provisional Authority in Baghdad to cancel three contracts for Iraqi cell phone networks worth about $500 million annually, citing fraud and the companies' links to an Iraqi-born Briton with ties to Saddam Hussein.

    S. Korea troop cuts tied to restructuring
    June 21, 2004
    The planned withdrawal of 12,500 U.S. troops from South Korea comes amid increased defenses against a weaker but still dangerous North Korean military threat, according to Pentagon officials and a military report.

    Navy secretary to lead reviews in Guantanamo
    June 18, 2004
    Navy Secretary Gordon England has been picked to head a review process that will determine whether to release prisoners detained at the U.S. naval base in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, defense officials said.

    Panel suggests revisiting U.S. 'one-China' policy
    June 16, 2004
    A congressional commission yesterday called on the Bush administration to review the so-called "one-China" policy that has guided U.S. ties with Beijing since 1972 and isolated a U.S. ally in the Republic of China (Taiwan).

    Iraq cell-phone bribery suspected
    June 15, 2004
    The FBI is conducting a preliminary inquiry into whether a businessman linked to Saddam Hussein's regime bribed U.S. and Iraqi officials to fix bids for Iraqi cell-phone contracts worth hundreds of millions of dollars, U.S. officials said.

    Sanchez removes self from inquiry on abuse
    June 11, 2004
    The three-star Army general overseeing the investigation of prisoner abuse in Iraq has asked to be recused from the probe in order to preserve its integrity and satisfy military rules, a Pentagon spokesman said yesterday.

    Pentagon to stress speed over mass
    June 10, 2004
    The Bush administration is nearing completion of a new defense posture that will shift troops and weapons overseas and emphasize rapid deployment over numbers of troops, tanks, ships and aircraft.

    Backers defend Chalabi's service
    June 9, 2004
    Military and intelligence agency supporters of Iraqi political leader Ahmed Chalabi, who is accused of leaking U.S. secrets to Iran, say data provided by his Iraqi National Congress network identified current leaders of the Iraq insurgency and helped forestall attacks on U.S. troops.

    Leader leaves behind mixed record at agency
    June 4, 2004
    Retiring CIA Director George J. Tenet had a mixed record of failure and success during his nine years at the agency, including the major intelligence failure surrounding the September 11 attacks and lapses in assessing Iraq's weapons of mass destruction.

    FBI probes charge of Chalabi leak to Iran
    June 3, 2004
    U.S. officials yesterday confirmed the FBI is investigating whether a government employee provided Iraqi political leader Ahmed Chalabi intelligence he is accused of giving Iran, but several said the prominent member of Iraq's now-dissolved Governing Council is the target of a disinformation campaign.

    China war games seen as 'message'
    June 2, 2004
    China's military is preparing to hold large-scale war games intended as a "political message" to Taiwan, amid heightened tensions between the island and mainland, according to U.S. intelligence officials.

    U.S. to abandon N. Korea project
    May 28, 2004
    The Bush administration plans to cancel an international project to build two light-water nuclear reactors for North Korea before the end of the year, State Department officials said.

    Radar sale to China stopped
    May 26, 2004
    The Bush administration blocked the sale of an advanced radar system to China and might purchase at least one of the stealth aircraft-detecting systems to offset the loss, U.S. and European officials said.

    Iraqi weapons pipeline probed
    May 25, 2004
    The Pentagon is investigating reports that Iraqi weapons are being sent covertly to Syria and that they are fueling anti-U.S. insurgents training there, The Washington Times has learned.

    State confirms N. Korea light-water reactor talk
    May 20, 2004
    The State Department yesterday confirmed that North Korea discussed another deal with the United States for a nuclear reactor program during closed-door talks in Beijing last week, as three lawmakers urged the Bush administration not to resurrect a reactor deal with Pyongyang.

    U.S. considers reactor deal with North Korea
    May 19, 2004
    The United States said it would consider again supplying North Korea with a light-water nuclear reactor as part of recent talks in Beijing, according to Bush administration officials.

    Bomb in Iraq contained sarin agent, military says
    May 18, 2004
    A roadside bomb found in Baghdad contained a deadly nerve agent, the second time in 10 days, that U.S. forces have found weapons of mass destruction hidden since the fall of Saddam Hussein, U.S. officials said yesterday.

    Zarqawi beheaded Berg, CIA finds
    May 14, 2004
    The CIA concluded yesterday that the hooded terrorist shown beheading an American civilian in a videotape is al Qaeda-linked terrorist Abu Musab Zarqawi.

    Iraq arms caches exceed 8,700; hunt continues
    May 13, 2004
    The U.S. military continues to find in Iraq large caches of the weapons that have supported attacks by insurgents on coalition forces, the Pentagon's top general said yesterday.

    Rumsfeld backs military's handling of abuse scandal
    May 12, 2004
    A defiant Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld yesterday defended the military's handling of the abuse of Iraqi prisoners at Abu Ghraib prison and denied a "culture of deception" exists.

    Policies proscribe forms of torture
    May 11, 2004
    U.S. military guidelines and international conventions bar the types of treatment of prisoners depicted in recently released photographs; specifically, mental torture, such as mock executions and abnormal sleep deprivation.

    Doctrine to restructure counterspy agencies
    May 10, 2004
    The Bush administration is preparing to restructure counterspy agencies to focus more on offensive operations and better interagency communication, a senior intelligence official says.

    Iraqi probed in rigging of cell-phone pacts
    May 9, 2004
    An international financier with ties to Saddam Hussein's regime and the United Nations' oil-for-food program helped Middle Eastern and European cell-phone companies edge out American firms for lucrative Iraqi contracts, The Washington Times has learned.

    Most prisoners in Iraq jails called 'threat to security'
    May 6, 2004
    Nearly all 8,080 prisoners being held by U.S. authorities in Iraq are considered security threats: insurgents linked to attacks on coalition forces, and terrorists and former officials of Saddam Hussein's regime suspected of having useful intelligence, military officials say.

    Full Iraq deployment to stay through 2005
    May 5, 2004
    The Pentagon announced yesterday it will maintain its expanded force of 138,000 troops in Iraq at least through 2005, based on a request from Gen. John Abizaid, commander of forces in the region.

    No more troops needed in Iraq, says Gen. Abizaid
    May 1, 2004
    The commander of U.S. forces in Iraq said yesterday the fighting in the country has been the toughest in months, but added that no more troops are needed unless fighting there intensifies.

    Peacekeeping force planned for Africa
    April 30, 2004
    The Pentagon and State Department are planning to set up a 75,000-member international peacekeeping force for Africa, senior Bush administration officials told Congress yesterday.

    Madrid suspect not linked to 9/11
    April 29, 2004
    U.S. intelligence agencies have not been able to link an Islamist extremist wanted in the Madrid train bombings to the September 11 attacks, as an indictment released yesterday in Spain charges.

    Probe notes lapses in chemical arms disclosures
    April 27, 2004
    Russia, China and Iran have failed to fully disclose details of their chemical weapons programs and arsenals that are to be destroyed under a 1997 treaty, raising proliferation risks, according to a congressional report.

    Chinese diplomats rush past lab guards
    April 26, 2004
    Two Chinese diplomats, away from their Los Angeles consulate improperly, recently sped their vehicle past a Los Alamos National Laboratory guard post near classified facilities in what U.S. officials think was an intelligence mission, The Washington Times has learned.

    U.S. to continue sale of defensive arms to Taiwan
    April 22, 2004
    The United States will continue to sell defensive arms to Taiwan under the provisions of a 1979 law, but the island nation's government should not move toward formal independence, a senior State Department official told Congress yesterday.

    Troops for Iraq to cost $700 million
    April 22, 2004
    Gen. Richard B. Myers, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, yesterday told a House committee initial estimates for keeping additional troops in Iraq through July for security reasons will cost about $700 million.

    Allies expected to stay on 'sidelines'
    April 21, 2004
    Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz yesterday told a Senate committee that he doesn't expect more allies to put troops on the ground in Iraq as long as fighting continues, even if the United Nations is given a greater role.

    Cheney praises troops in S. Korea
    April 17, 2004
    SEOUL U.S. and allied forces deployed in South Korea are on the front line of freedom and democracy, Vice President Dick Cheney told U.S. troops here yesterday.

    Cheney chides China on reforms
    April 16, 2004
    SEOUL Vice President Dick Cheney called on China to match its economic changes with political reform, and he warned yesterday that the failure to resolve the North Korea crisis could trigger a nuclear arms race in Asia.

    Cheney stands firm on U.S. weapons for Taiwan
    April 14, 2004
    SHANGHAI Vice President Dick Cheney yesterday told Chinese leaders that the United States is committed to its arms sales to Taiwan, and prodded China to pressure North Korea to abandon its nuclear program.

    Cheney to press Koizumi on Iraq course
    April 12, 2004
    TOKYO Vice President Dick Cheney will hold talks today with Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi amid mounting public pressure here over the kidnapping of three Japanese nationals in Iraq.

    Cheney to urge staying course
    April 10, 2004
    ANCHORAGE, Alaska Vice President Dick Cheney said yesterday the United States must stay the course in Iraq and fight to bring liberty to the Iraqi people.

    Cheney set to leave for Asia
    April 9, 2004
    Vice President Dick Cheney is scheduled to leave today on a seven-day trip to Asia, where he will discuss North Korea, Taiwan and trade with Chinese leaders.

    Regime remnants' hit Marines, says JCS general
    April 8, 2004
    A group of about 70 Iraqis who attacked a Marine Corps unit in Ramadi were trained military fighters who disappeared after the battle, defense officials said yesterday.

    U.S. official resigns over differences on Taiwan
    April 8, 2004
    The head of the unofficial U.S. government office in charge of ties with Taiwan resigned yesterday amid reports that the Chinese government opposed her pro-Taiwan views.

    Beijing seeks ouster of envoy
    April 7, 2004
    The State Department is planning to replace the head of the unofficial U.S. government office in charge of Taiwan after receiving complaints from Beijing, The Washington Times has learned.

    Pakistan government cleared in selling of nuclear material
    March 31, 2004
    A Pakistani network that covertly sold nuclear goods used government aircraft but the Islamabad government was not involved in the transactions, a senior State Department official told Congress yesterday.

    Reprisal fears silence arms chiefs
    March 31, 2004
    Former Iraqi officials are reluctant to provide information about Saddam Hussein's arms programs because they fear retribution from terrorists loyal to the former regime, the CIA's top weapons inspector told Congress yesterday.

    Bush critic cites terror failures
    March 25, 2004
    A former White House counterterrorism official apologized yesterday for government failures in the September 11 terrorist attacks, but his credibility was challenged during a public hearing.

    Report cites bin Laden's escapes
    March 24, 2004
    Faulty and incomplete intelligence prevented three military attacks against al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden in 1998 and 1999, according to a commission investigating the September 11 terrorist attacks.

    Saddam gone, but insurgents undermine success
    March 19, 2004
    A year after U.S. military forces invaded Iraq, the regime of Saddam Hussein has been ousted, but a bloody counterinsurgency persists, fueled by terrorists and former regime loyalists.

    China flexes missile muscle on eve of Taiwan vote
    March 18, 2004
    China carried out at least five missile tests since January as part of a major buildup of missile forces before a vote in Taiwan on the mainland missile threat, U.S. intelligence officials said yesterday.

    Beijing quiet ahead of election
    March 16, 2004
    China's military is not using war games to threaten Taiwan before the island's elections, though Bush administration officials said yesterday that Beijing clearly supports the opposition party.

    Ex-Hill aide charged in spying for Iraq
    March 12, 2004
    A former congressional aide for several Democratic lawmakers was arrested yesterday as a spy and agent of influence for Saddam Hussein's Iraq.

    Tenet warns of al Qaeda's 'spectacular attacks' plans
    March 10, 2004
    CIA Director George J. Tenet warned Congress yesterday that the threat of al Qaeda terrorists acquiring weapons of mass destruction is growing and the group continues planning "spectacular attacks" against the United States and its allies.

    Senate panel set to hear CIA chief
    March 4, 2004
    CIA Director George J. Tenet is expected to defend the record of U.S. intelligence agencies on Iraq's weapons program and ties to terrorists today during a closed-door hearing of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence.

    Abizaid blames hits on al Qaeda
    March 4, 2004
    The general in charge of U.S. forces in the Middle East said yesterday that al Qaeda terrorists have linked up with Saddam Hussein's former intelligence operatives in conducting sophisticated and deadly terrorist attacks.

    FBI lab probes initials of pilot
    March 3, 2004
    An FBI laboratory is investigating evidence obtained in Iraq regarding missing Navy pilot Capt. Michael Scott Speicher, U.S. officials say.

    U.S. to send 'small' operation to Haiti
    March 2, 2004
    The Pentagon will dispatch up to 2,000 Marines to Haiti to restore order in the country before an international peacekeeping force takes over.

    Taiwan shoring up defenses with U.S. assistance
    February 29, 2004
    Taiwan and the United States have made "remarkable progress" in bolstering Taipei's defenses in the face of a growing military threat from China, according to a former Pentagon specialist on China.

    Change of climate a security factor
    February 27, 2004
    Abrupt global climate changes will lead to wars over food, water and oil and leave the earth in a new ice age with raging seas, storms and wind, according to a Pentagon-commissioned study.

    Al Qaeda plans 'revisit' to White House, Capitol
    February 25, 2004
    The al Qaeda terrorist group still is planning to attack the White House and Congress targets the group missed on September 11 and a growing extremist Muslim movement is threatening the United States, the directors of the FBI and CIA told Congress yesterday.

    Pentagon axes development of Comanche helicopter
    February 24, 2004
    The Pentagon announced yesterday that it is canceling the Army's program to build a new helicopter after spending about $7 billion in development costs.

    Former Polish spy dies at 73
    February 12, 2004
    A former Polish military officer who supplied the CIA with crucial intelligence in the last years of the Cold War has died.

    Intelligence has flaws, officials say
    February 11, 2004
    U.S. intelligence agencies have a mixed record in supplying data to policy-makers and in the past have missed important events, senior defense and military leaders said yesterday.

    U.S. weighs selling sea-based defenses to Taiwan
    February 8, 2004
    China's military buildup opposite Taiwan is destabilizing the region, and in response, the United States is considering selling sea-based missile defenses to the island nation, Pentagon and State Department officials say.

    Tenet supports CIA data, search for Iraqi weapons
    February 6, 2004
    CIA Director George J. Tenet yesterday acknowledged intelligence shortcomings in the run-up to the Iraq war but said teams searching for Saddam Hussein's banned weapons of mass destruction need more time.

    Boeing sale to China skirts ban on technology transfer
    February 5, 2004
    China has obtained military navigation technology from Boeing used on advanced U.S. missiles and warplanes that was improperly approved by the State Department, according to U.S. government officials.

    Tenet's tenure in question
    February 3, 2004
    Accusations that U.S. intelligence agencies were wrong about Iraq's illegal weapons programs are fueling speculation that CIA Director George J. Tenet will step down in coming months.

    Lack of data got intelligence on Iraq 'all wrong'
    January 29, 2004
    Weak human intelligence-gathering capability and limited data prevented U.S. intelligence analysts from figuring out that Iraq did not have large stockpiles of chemical and biological weapons, the CIA's former chief arms inspector told Congress yesterday.

    North Korean refugees get harsh treatment on return
    January 27, 2004
    An increasing number of North Korean refugees are fleeing to China, where they are detained and sent back to face harsh treatment in their home country, according to a human rights activist from the region.

    U.S., Iraqis capture al Qaeda 'facilitator'
    January 24, 2004
    U.S. and Iraqi security officials have captured a senior al Qaeda operations leader in Iraq, who intelligence officials believe was planning for attacks against U.S. and coalition forces, The Washington Times has learned.

    'Eroded' al Qaeda still a threat
    January 16, 2004
    Al Qaeda's capability to conduct major attacks has "eroded significantly" as a result of the war on terrorism, but the terrorist group has not been destroyed, according to U.S. intelligence officials and security specialists.

    South Korea receives advanced Patriots
    November 20, 2003
    OSAN AIR BASE, South Korea You can tell which way is north here by the way the Patriot missiles are pointed.

    Rumsfeld supports reunified Korea
    November 19, 2003
    ELMENDORF AIR FORCE BASE, Alaska Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said yesterday he is optimistic that North and South Korea will be reunified.

    Nukes option by U.S. in Korea
    November 18, 2003
    SEOUL The United States is committed to defending South Korea from an attack by the North and would use nuclear forces if needed, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld told the government here yesterday.

    U.S. commander fears N. Korea would sell nukes
    November 18, 2003
    SEOUL North Korea poses a regional danger because the communist regime is likely to sell its nuclear arms and expertise to rogue states or terrorists, the commander of U.S. forces in South Korea said yesterday.

    Rumsfeld defends use of sonar to Okinawans
    November 17, 2003
    SEOUL Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld yesterday defended the Navy's use of sonar in the Pacific and told the governor of Okinawa, Japan, that scientific studies have shown it poses little danger to the environment.

    U.S. reassures Japan on N. Korean pact
    November 16, 2003
    TOKYO The United States will not conclude an agreement with North Korea on its nuclear-arms program without verification, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said yesterday.

    Rumsfeld meets Japanese premier
    November 15, 2003
    TOKYO Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld met yesterday with Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi one day after the government here announced it will delay sending troops to Iraq.

    Rumsfeld will restructure U.S. military forces in Asia
    November 14, 2003
    TUMON, Guam Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said yesterday he is planning a major restructuring of U.S. forces in Asia and elsewhere to meet changing threats.

    Kim wants to rule all Korea, defector warns
    November 4, 2003
    The lifelong ambition of Kim Jong-il is to become dictator over a unified, communist Korea, a former top North Korean official said yesterday.

    U.S. lacks direction, cohesion in war of ideas
    October 30, 2003
    The Bush administration's effort to wage a war of ideas against terrorism is hampered by divisions among agencies and by a lack of focus on winning Muslim support.

    Rumsfeld confers at Pentagon with his Chinese counterpart
    October 29, 2003
    Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld met yesterday with China's defense minister for the first high-level military exchange since the U.S.-China crisis involving a midair collision in April 2001.

    Spy chief says Iraq moved weapons
    October 29, 2003
    Iraqi military officers destroyed or hid chemical, biological and nuclear weapons goods in the weeks before the war, the nation's top satellite spy director said yesterday.

    Rumsfeld pushes 'new sense of urgency'
    October 24, 2003
    The United States needs to communicate its messages more effectively and a new agency would help fight a "war of ideas" against international terrorism, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said yesterday in an interview with The Washington Times.

    Defense inspector backs giving medal
    October 23, 2003
    The Pentagon inspector general has asked the Navy to consider awarding a medal to an intelligence officer whose eyes were damaged by a laser fired from a Russian ship in 1997, injuries an earlier Navy probe said could not be linked definitively to the incident.

    CIA declined intelligence, former official says
    October 22, 2003
    The CIA and the Iraq Survey Group failed to pursue information that Iraq smuggled uranium to Iran five years ago, according to a former State Department official.

    Rumsfeld backs inside probe of general's speech
    October 22, 2003
    Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said yesterday that he welcomes an internal investigation of a three-star general who spoke of the war on terrorism in religious terms.

    N. Korea retests 100-mile-range cruise missile
    October 22, 2003
    North Korea yesterday conducted the third test flight of a new cruise missile hours after President Bush offered the communist state a concession aimed at resolving the nuclear-arms standoff.

    Al Qaeda pursued a 'dirty bomb'
    October 17, 2003
    A key al Qaeda terrorism suspect was in Canada looking for nuclear material for a "dirty bomb," The Washington Times has learned.

    Chinese war games to face Taiwan again
    October 13, 2003
    China is set to hold large-scale military exercises aimed at stepping up pressure on Taiwan's government, U.S. officials said yesterday.

    Iraq paid N. Korea to deliver missiles
    October 2, 2003
    Saddam Hussein's government paid North Korea $10 million for medium-range Nodong missile technology in the months before the Iraq war, but never received any goods because of U.S. pressure, the chief U.S. weapons inspector in Iraq said yesterday.

    CIA pursues video game
    September 29, 2003
    The CIA is set to spend several million dollars to develop a video game aimed at helping its analysts think like terrorists, The Washington Times has learned.

    U.S. tags China with stiff penalties
    September 19, 2003
    The State Department has imposed economic sanctions on China for its sales of missile technology, State Department officials said yesterday.

    U.S. sanctions Moscow-owned firm for Iran sales
    September 16, 2003
    The State Department has imposed economic sanctions on a Russian government-owned company for selling advanced weapons to Iran, a country designated as a state sponsor of international terrorism.

    China blamed in '01 air collision
    September 13, 2003
    A Navy report says a Chinese F-8 jet pilot was to blame for the midair collision over the South China Sea that nearly killed the crew of a U.S.

    Voice on tape deemed al-Zawahri
    September 12, 2003
    The CIA has concluded that a recent audiotape of al Qaeda leaders contains the voice of No. 2 official Ayman al-Zawahri, but the voice of Osama bin Laden may be taken from an old recording.

    French firm probed in move of pumps to Iran
    September 5, 2003
    U.S. export-control officials are investigating a French company suspected of illegally supplying Iran with four specialty pumps made in the United States that can be used in both commercial and military equipment, The Washington Times has learned.

    Pollard attorneys seek access to secret report used in spy sentencing
    September 3, 2003
    Jonathan Jay Pollard, convicted of spying for Israel, appeared in federal court yesterday for the first time in 16 years as his attorneys sought access to a secret report used in a judge's decision to give him a life prison term.

    Islamists to honor 9/11 hijackers
    August 30, 2003
    The British-based Islamist group Al-Muhajiroun is holding a conference on the second anniversary of September 11 to honor the 19 terrorists who hijacked the commercial jets used in attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon.

    Coalition forces in Iraq capture 'Chemical Ali'
    August 22, 2003
    Coalition military forces in Iraq captured a senior aide to Saddam Hussein yesterday as the commander of U.S. troops in Iraq said terrorism poses the "No. 1 threat" to U.S. forces there.

    Covert-action curbs fought by Pentagon
    Aug. 14, 2003
    The Pentagon is working to block Congress from adopting restrictions that would make it more difficult to deploy Special Operations Forces on clandestine missions, a spokesman said yesterday.

    SEALs scout out Liberian seaport
    Aug. 14, 2003
    A team of U.S. Navy SEAL commandos began searching waters around Liberia's main seaport yesterday in preparation for the brief deployment of 200 Marines.

    Congress to restrict use of Special Ops
    August 13, 2003
    Congress is set to impose new restrictions on the use of Special Operations Forces that for the first time will require a presidential order before deploying commandos in routine but hidden activities.

    Briton held in scheme to sell missile
    August 13, 2003
    A British national was arrested yesterday in an international antiterrorism sting operation against a scheme to smuggle Russian-made surface-to-air missiles into the United States that could shoot down a commercial jetliner, federal authorities said.

    Chinese students suspects in espionage
    August 5, 2003
    Two Chinese students studying in the United States supplied China's military with American defense technology that allowed Beijing to produce a special metal used in sensors and weapons, according to a Pentagon report.

    Taped message believed from bin Laden deputy
    August 5, 2003
    U.S. intelligence has determined that a tape-recorded message from an al Qaeda terrorist probably contains the voice of the group's No. 2 leader, Ayman Al-Zawahiri.

    Chinese missiles called destabilizing
    August 1, 2003
    The White House yesterday said China's buildup of missiles opposite Taiwan is destabilizing the region.

    Pentagon says China refitting missiles to hit Okinawa
    July 31, 2003
    China is modifying short-range mobile missiles to target U.S. forces in Okinawa and is sharply increasing the number of missiles aimed at Taiwan, according to the Pentagon's latest annual report on Chinese military power.

    September 11 report alludes to Iraq-al Qaeda meeting
    July 30, 2003
    The 850-page congressional report on September 11 intelligence failures says that a key terrorist organizer may have met with an Iraqi intelligence officer in the months before the attack.

    Swiss delay of military parts sparks 'buy American' push
    A Swiss company's refusal to provide critical parts for the Pentagon's flagship Joint Direct Attack Munition during the Iraq war shows the need for "buy American" laws, the chairman of the House Armed Services Committee said yesterday.

    Al Qaeda terrorists being held by Iran
    July 24, 2003
    Iran said yesterday it is holding senior al Qaeda terrorists, and the White House told Tehran to turn them over to the United States.

    Saddam's sons dead
    July 23, 2003
    U.S. military forces attacked a villa in northern Iraq yesterday and killed Saddam Hussein's two sons, both former regime leaders, in a fierce gunbattle.

    2nd N. Korean nuclear site not likely
    July 22, 2003
    Radioactive gas detected recently over North Korea by U.S. intelligence agencies is likely to have originated from the Yongbyon reprocessing plant and not from a separate, secret nuclear site, The Washington Times has learned.

    FBI probing forged papers on Niger uranium
    July 19, 2003
    The FBI is investigating the origin of forged documents indicating that Iraq was seeking uranium from Niger, and one candidate for the forgeries is an Iraqi opposition group, U.S. officials said.

    N. Korea nukes still 'serious' issue to U.S.
    July 16, 2003
    North Korea's nuclear activities, including its repeated claims to be reprocessing stored nuclear-fuel rods, remain a "serious problem" for the United States, Bush administration officials said yesterday.

    CIA chief intends to stay on job
    July 15, 2003
    CIA Director George J. Tenet has no plans to step down as agency chief despite calls by critics for his ouster due to a string of intelligence lapses, U.S. officials said yesterday.

    CIA shifts on North Korean nukes
    July 4, 2003
    The CIA has revised an earlier intelligence estimate and now believes North Korea has begun reprocessing spent nuclear-fuel rods into plutonium for weapons, U.S. officials said.

    U.S. sets sanctions for Iran arms sales
    July 4, 2003
    The Bush administration announced yesterday it has imposed economic sanctions on Chinese and North Korean companies for selling chemical-, biological- and nuclear-arms material and missile goods to Iran.

    Foreign troops 'gear up' to enter Iraq
    July 1, 2003
    Two divisions of international troops will begin moving into Iraq by the end of this month to help relieve the nearly 150,000 American troops now working to stabilize the country, Pentagon officials said yesterday.

    Musharraf seeks Predators and 60 long-delayed F-16s
    June 27, 2003
    Pakistani President Gen. Pervez Musharraf yesterday said he hopes the United States will sell his country sophisticated military hardware for its defense needs, including F-16 jets and Predator unmanned aerial vehicles, but if the request is denied he will seek weapons from other countries.

    CIA finds papers, parts in Iraq for enriching uranium
    June 26, 2003
    The CIA has uncovered components of a gas centrifuge used to enrich weapons-grade uranium, and a stack of nuclear arms documents in the back yard of an Iraqi scientist, an indication Baghdad was hiding its arms program for future use, a U.S. intelligence official said yesterday.

    Abizaid sure Iraq arms will be found
    June 26, 2003
    The incoming commander of U.S. forces in Iraq said yesterday that he expects stockpiles of chemical and biological weapons and an illicit program to build nuclear arms to be uncovered in Iraq.

    U.S. maintains search for missing 1991 aviator
    June 25, 2003
    A special U.S. intelligence team in Iraq has searched a half-dozen graves and more than 40 locations in Iraq but has not found missing naval aviator Capt. Michael Scott Speicher, defense officials say.

    Failed missile-defense test probed
    June 20, 2003
    Preliminary data from a sea-based missile-defense test show that the failure of a solid-fuel guidance system caused a Navy interceptor missile to miss a target missile, Pentagon officials said.

    Air Force decides against courts-martial for two pilots
    June 20, 2003
    Two U.S. Air Force pilots involved in a friendly fire bombing incident in Afghanistan will not be court-martialed in the accidental deaths of four Canadian troops.

    Lack of spies in Baghdad spurs CIA to bolster ranks
    June 18, 2003
    The CIA lacked spies on the ground in Iraq who could detail Baghdad's weapons programs and is working to build up its ranks after years of neglect, according to current and former U.S. intelligence officials.

    Iraqi group aided CIA intelligence
    June 12, 2003
    The head of the Iraqi National Congress, a group of exiles that opposed Saddam Hussein, said yesterday that his organization helped three Iraqi defectors provide intelligence to the CIA on Iraq's weapons programs.

    Army chief pick shows Rumsfeld's new focus
    June 11, 2003
    Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld has picked a retired Special Forces general as his choice for the next Army chief of staff, defense officials said yesterday.

    U.S. says Iran harbors al Qaeda 'associate'
    June 10, 2003
    A top al Qaeda associate in Iraq has fled to neighboring Iran, where he and several senior al Qaeda leaders apparently remain under the protection of the Iranian government, U.S. intelligence officials say.

    Pentagon to shift troops in S. Korea
    June 6, 2003
    The U.S. military will move thousands of troops from bases near the border with North Korea to areas farther south, the Pentagon announced yesterday.

    Al Qaeda seen as not driven by ideology
    June 5, 2003
    A two-person Pentagon intelligence team conducted an analysis that found al Qaeda terrorists are not bound by ideology and will cooperate with state sponsors of terrorism.

    CIA chief defends agency job in Iraq
    June 5, 2003
    CIA Director George J. Tenet said U.S. intelligence on Iraq's weapons program was produced honestly and dismissed critics who charge that estimates of Baghdad's arms programs were exaggerated to justify the war.

    CIA says al Qaeda ready to use nukes
    June 3, 2003
    Al Qaeda terrorists and related groups are set to use chemical, biological and nuclear weapons in deadly strikes, according to a new CIA report.

    Bush case on defense plan cites N. Korea
    May 27, 2003
    President Bush specifically names North Korea as a key threat in an unpublished order on missile defense and says such a system is needed as a hedge against military surprises and intelligence failures.

    Intelligence team finds French passports in Iraq
    May 24, 2003
    A U.S. military intelligence team in Iraq has uncovered a dozen French passports, and defense officials believe other French passports from the same batch were used by Iraqis to flee the country.

    Chinese firm hit with U.S. sanctions
    May 23, 2003
    The Bush administration has imposed stiff economic sanctions on one of China's largest state-run manufacturers for selling missile-related goods to Iran.

    Fighters deployed over D.C.
    May 22, 2003
    The U.S. military deployed air-defense missiles and fighter jets in Washington for an exercise amid heightened threats of terrorism, as al Qaeda's No. 2 official purportedly issued a message yesterday urging Muslims to kill Americans and Israelis and warning of attacks.

    U.S. probes passports as France protests 'lies'
    May 17, 2003
    The Department of Homeland Security is investigating whether the French government provided passports to members of Saddam Hussein's regime fleeing Iraq as French Foreign Minister Dominique de Villepin demanded yesterday that "lies" published in the U.S. and British press stop.

    U.S. urges travelers to drop Kenya plans
    May 16, 2003
    Information about al Qaeda plans for attacks in Africa, including the use of shoulder-fired missiles against aircraft, prompted Britain to suspend commercial flights to Kenya yesterday, and the U.S. government warned Americans to avoid travel to the region.

    Warning of attacks by al Qaeda preceded bombings
    May 14, 2003
    U.S. intelligence agencies believe the deadly car bombings in Saudi Arabia on Monday night were the work of al Qaeda and said the attacks occurred just days after an e-mail warned of an "inevitable" strike against Americans.

    N. Korea fired laser at troops
    May 13, 2003
    North Korea's military fired a laser in March at two U.S. Army helicopters patrolling the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas in what U.S. officials call a provocative action, The Washington Times has learned.

    Rumsfeld expects to find French aided Iraqis
    May 10, 2003
    Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said yesterday that he expects to find out about French support for Saddam Hussein's government from information recovered by coalition forces now working in Iraq.

    Probe of French passports sought
    May 9, 2003
    The chairman of the House Judiciary Committee yesterday urged the Bush administration to investigate accusations that France provided passports to fleeing Iraqi officials.

    U.S. sees proof of biolab
    May 8, 2003
    The Pentagon confirmed yesterday that a tractor-trailer found in northern Iraq is a mobile biological laboratory that could be used to make deadly germ weapons.

    North Korea may export nukes
    May 7, 2003
    North Korea threatened during recent talks in Beijing to export nuclear arms or add to its arsenal, in addition to saying it will test an atomic bomb, The Washington Times has learned.

    Search for Iraqis focuses on Europe
    May 7, 2003
    U.S. intelligence agencies are intensifying the search in Europe for officials of Saddam Hussein's government who fled Iraq with the help of French passports, U.S. officials said yesterday.

    France helped Iraqis escape
    May 6, 2003
    The French government secretly supplied fleeing Iraqi officials with passports in Syria that allowed them to escape to Europe, The Washington Times has learned.

    Mobile lab might be for Iraqi arms
    May 3, 2003
    U.S. intelligence agencies are investigating a mobile laboratory discovered recently in northern Iraq that appears to be a transportable biological or chemical weapons facility, defense officials said.

    'Shaming effect' on Arab world
    April 29, 2003
    Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz, a key architect of President Bush's Iraq policy, said yesterday that the ouster of Saddam Hussein has had a "shaming effect" on the Arab and Muslim world where other tyrannical rulers exist.

    Iranians move in to shape Iraq
    April 26, 2003
    Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said yesterday that Iran has dispatched "organized elements" to Iraq in a bid to influence the creation of an Islamist system.

    Progress reported in search for Speicher
    April 25, 2003
    CIA and Defense Intelligence Agency officials said they are making progress in finding a missing Navy pilot and have dismissed months of faulty intelligence reports.

    N. Korea to process fuel rods
    April 24, 2003
    North Korea opened a meeting with U.S. and Chinese officials in Beijing yesterday with a tough reiteration of its plans to reprocess spent nuclear fuel rods now in storage.

    Coalition forces uncover Iraqi torture chambers, graves
    April 23, 2003
    Coalition forces have discovered numerous torture chambers used by Saddam Hussein's secret police and political operatives to silence opponents, as well as mass graves where executed dissidents were buried.

    Army bid to locate pilot turns up empty
    April 22, 2003
    A U.S. military search team in Iraq has checked three sites in the country for signs of a Navy pilot missing from the 1991 Persian Gulf war but has found nothing, defense officials said yesterday.

    Rumsfeld denies plan for permanent U.S. bases in Iraq
    April 22, 2003
    Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said yesterday the military has no plans to set up long-term bases in Iraq for U.S. forces.

    2nd Saddam brother captured
    April 18, 2003
    U.S. Special Forces and Marines yesterday captured another of Saddam Hussein's half brothers, a former head of Iraqi intelligence, as teams of coalition forces focused on finding chemical, biological and nuclear weapons.

    Syria pledges to help U.S. in rebuilding of Iraq
    April 17, 2003
    Syria yesterday pledged to cooperate with the United States in the rebuilding of Iraq and denied U.S. accusations that it had harbored an Iraqi intelligence officer linked to the 1993 plot to assassinate President Bush's father.

    Terrorist Abu Abbas caught in Iraq
    April 16, 2003
    U.S. Special Forces in Baghdad have captured long-sought Middle East terrorist Abu Abbas, known for organizing the 1985 hijacking of the Achille Lauro cruise ship in which elderly American passenger Leon Klinghoffer was murdered.

    Iraqi oil pipeline to Syria closed
    April 16, 2003
    The U.S. military has shut down an illegal oil pipeline between Iraq and Syria, as allied military operations against Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein's forces continued to wind down with sporadic fighting yesterday.

    Guerrilla fighters seen as threat to allied forces
    April 15, 2003
    Conventional military conflict in Iraq is nearly over, but thousands of foreign fighters and supporters of Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein remain in the country and pose a danger to U.S. and allied forces, U.S. officials said yesterday.

    Army probes buried trailers
    April 15, 2003
    U.S. Army forces have discovered 11 large containers with equipment inside that appear to be elements of Iraq's covert mobile chemical and biological weapons program.

    Coalition turns to Tikrit
    April 13, 2003
    Coalition forces prepared to mount an all-out assault on the northern Iraq city of Tikrit the last stronghold of Saddam Hussein's regime as a senior Iraqi arms official surrendered to U.S. forces yesterday.

    A thousand sites to be inspected for WMD
    April 12, 2003
    U.S. military specialists in Iraq have inspected about 12 possible chemical, biological and nuclear weapons sites in Iraq and have a list of 1,000 sites to be checked in the coming days now that organized Iraqi military resistance has collapsed.

    Saddam's 'regime has ended'
    April 12, 2003
    The White House yesterday declared that Saddam Hussein's regime is finished in Iraq on the war's 24th day, as U.S. intelligence agencies are picking up reports that Saddam is dead.

    CIA report lists Iraqi violations of U.N.-banned arms
    April 11, 2003
    President Saddam Hussein's Iraq had expanded work on long-range missiles banned under United Nations sanctions and continued last year to develop nuclear, chemical and biological weapons, the CIA stated in a report made public yesterday.

    Jail yields clues in search for POWs
    April 11, 2003
    Iraq's notorious Rasheed military prison in eastern Baghdad has produced new leads in the search for U.S. and other prisoners of war from the current conflict and the 1991 Persian Gulf war, defense officials said.

    Allies take key northern city
    April 11, 2003
    The U.S.-led coalition yesterday captured its first major northern Iraqi city and encircled another, setting the stage to attack Saddam Hussein's hometown of Tikrit in what promises to be the war's last major battle.

    Allies shift strength to Saddam's home
    April 10, 2003
    With Baghdad overrun, U.S. military forces are now aiming at the northern city of Tikrit, Saddam Hussein's ancestral home and the last stronghold of his regime.

    Baghdad falls
    April 10, 2003
    Baghdad fell yesterday and Iraqis cheered in the streets after American infantrymen seized deserted Ba'ath Party ministries and pulled down a huge iron statue of Saddam Hussein, ending his autocratic 24-year rule of Iraq.


    Notice: The news story links below are inactive as a result of The Washington Times web site redesign. I apologize for any inconvenience.

    U.S. fears attacks from Muslims in armed forces
    April 9, 2003
    U.S. intelligence and security officials fear attacks by Muslim U.S. soldiers opposed to the war in Iraq in the wake of a fatal grenade attack in Kuwait blamed on a Muslim soldier in the Army.

    U.S. probes for Iraqi chemicals
    April 9, 2003
    U.S. military specialists are continuing to investigate chemicals and artillery shells found in Iraq to determine if they are part of President Saddam Hussein's arsenal of deadly nerve gas.

    Strike targets Saddam at restaurant
    April 8, 2003
    The U.S.-led coalition bombed a Baghdad commercial block yesterday after receiving a tip that Iraqi President Saddam Hussein was there, while across town the U.S. Army parked its tanks on the Tigris River in the front yard of one of the dictator's largest palaces.

    Terrorists said to seek entry to U.S. via Mexico
    April 7, 2003
    A group of al Qaeda terrorists is attempting to infiltrate the United States from Mexico to conduct attacks in the country, The Washington Times has learned.

    Air Force general says attacks will go until surrender
    April 6, 2003
    Precision bombing of Iraq's Republican Guard will continue until Iraqi forces surrender or are killed, the general in charge of the air attacks in the war said yesterday.

    Allies blast path through Baghdad
    April 6, 2003
    U.S. forces bombed the Basra residence of an Iraqi commander yesterday, believing he was inside, as coalition tanks moved into central Baghdad in a show of force marking a new phase in the war in Iraq.

    Coalition still wary of chemical weapons
    April 5, 2003
    The potential for Iraq to use chemical or biological weapons on coalition forces on the outskirts of downtown Baghdad remains high, despite several tactics used by U.S. forces to incapacitate the threat, U.S. military officials said yesterday.

    Iraq levels new threat
    April 5, 2003
    U.S. Marines declared they had destroyed a third Iraqi Republican Guard division yesterday, and the Saddam Hussein regime threatened to use unconventional warfare to prevent its extinction.

    Military answers critics with success
    April 4, 2003
    The rapid advance of U.S. military forces to within a few miles of Baghdad after two weeks of fighting has undermined critics of the military battle plan, according to several former top commanders.

    U.S. seizes Saddam Airport
    April 4, 2003
    The U.S. Army seized control of Saddam International Airport in the shadow of Baghdad last night, the first military tactic in a plan to encircle the city and squeeze Saddam Hussein's regime into submission.

    Military begins effort to identify 11 bodies
    April 3, 2003
    Military forensics officials are working to identify the remains of 11 persons found at an Iraqi hospital used by Iraqi guerrillas, as a wounded Pfc. Jessica Lynch, who was rescued Tuesday night, was moved to Germany.

    Forces clear path to Baghdad
    April 3, 2003
    U.S. Army and Marine Corps ground forces smashed two of President Saddam Hussein's prized Republican Guard divisions and then moved relentlessly yesterday to attack other units to clear a direct invasion path to Baghdad.

    U.S. demands unconditional surrender
    April 2, 2003
    Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld yesterday demanded the "unconditional surrender" of Saddam Hussein as the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff called criticism of the U.S. war plan in Iraq "bogus."

    Army clashes with elite forces
    April 1, 2003
    The first ground clashes between the Army and Republican Guard units erupted south of Baghdad yesterday as the Pentagon said relentless air strikes are methodically dismembering the Republican Guard, Saddam Hussein's best land force.

    Suicide bomber kills GIs
    March 30, 2003
    An Iraqi suicide bomber detonated a car bomb yesterday that killed four U.S. soldiers in Najaf as allied warplanes pounded Baghdad with precision aerial bombings. Explosions rocked the Iraqi capital, and smoke was seen rising from several parts of the city.

    Rumsfeld warns Syria, Iran
    March 29, 2003
    Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld yesterday told Syria and Iran that providing military supplies to Iraq or interfering with allied operations will be viewed as "hostile acts."

    Airborne forces work to secure the north
    March 28, 2003
    U.S. forces are flowing into northern Iraq in preparation for what the Pentagon calls its "northern option" to oust Saddam Hussein's government.

    Drowned Marines in full gear
    March 27, 2003
    Two Marines drowned in southern Iraq after attempting to cross a canal without a safety line while wearing heavy gear and rifles, The Washington Times has learned.

    Paramilitary forces hit army
    March 27, 2003
    Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein yesterday threw waves of marauding paramilitary forces from Baghdad against the Army's mechanized 5th Corps, while Iraqi tanks dashed from the besieged southern city of Basra, only to be pounded by waves of air strikes.

    Fedayeen Saddam 'essentially terrorists'
    March 26, 2003
    Up to 30,000 members of Iraq's black-hooded Fedayeen Saddam militia are using terrorist tactics to fight coalition forces in southern Iraq, are threatening the local population, and, intelligence reports indicate, plan to don U.S. military uniforms.

    British ready to seize Basra
    March 26, 2003
    British armored troops were poised last night to enter Basra to seize Iraq's second-largest city, as the U.S. Army's 7th Cavalry unit felt its way north in blinding sandstorms and beat back a surprise attack by grenade-firing Iraqis.

    Bush presses Putin to stop arms sales
    March 25, 2003
    President Bush yesterday called on Russia's government to investigate and halt arms shipments to Iraq from Russian companies.

    Army hits Republican Guard
    March 25, 2003
    U.S. Army units attacked the Iraqi Republican Guard for the first time yesterday south of Baghdad, while enemy paramilitary units doggedly refused to let go of the strategic port city of Umm Qasr.

    Troops advance on Baghdad
    March 23, 2003
    Missiles and guided bombs continued to slam into Baghdad targets yesterday as hundreds of tanks with thousands of U.S. troops marched north, coming within 100 miles of the Iraqi capital.

    Flexibility, precision key to new war
    March 23, 2003
    Military officials disclosed key elements of the Pentagon's 21st-century warfare strategy: flexible plans and strikes combined with attacks to produce specific effects.

    Team to search for pilot lost since first Gulf war
    March 22, 2003
    Defense and intelligence agencies have formed a special unit that will go into Iraq to search for Capt. Michael Scott Speicher, a missing U.S. Navy pilot believed to have been held captive in Iraq since 1991.

    U.S. remains uncertain of Saddam's status
    March 22, 2003
    U.S. intelligence analysts are still divided over whether Saddam Hussein is dead or alive two days after a bomb and missile attack on an Iraqi leadership bunker.

    'Shock and awe' begins
    March 22, 2003
    The United States and Britain unleashed a mighty bombardment yesterday on regime targets in Baghdad and other Iraqi cities as "the coalition of the willing" began the ballyhooed "shock and awe" phase of a war designed to bring down Saddam Hussein.

    U.S. says Saddam likely rattled
    March 21, 2003
    The U.S. missile and bomb attack yesterday on a leadership compound in Baghdad has shaken Saddam Hussein, and there were intelligence reports suggesting that Saddam himself might have been hit.

    Allied forces march into Iraq
    March 21, 2003
    U.S. and British forces drove north from Kuwait into Iraq yesterday, and new intelligence reports confirm that Saddam Hussein was in a building struck by two precision bombs on the war's opening day.

    Nation's biggest nuclear power plant a terrorist target
    Terrorists have targeted the United States' largest nuclear power plant near Phoenix, and security officials are looking for Iraqi government "sleeper cells" that might carry out the attack, The Washington Times has learned.

    Pentagon's 'weapons of mass persuasion' hit Iraq army
    March 19, 2003
    With war in Iraq imminent, the Pentagon is stepping up efforts to convince that country's military commanders and soldiers not to fight.

    Chinese sold Iraq 'dual-use' chemical
    March 15, 2003
    Despite French denials, U.S. intelligence and defense officials have confirmed that Iraq purchased from China a chemical used in making fuel for long-range missiles, with help from brokers in France and Syria.

    North Korea prepares new test of missile
    March 12, 2003
    North Korea is preparing another missile test, which would break Pyongyang's moratorium on long-range ballistic missile flights, U.S. intelligence officials said.

    Al Qaeda plans oil field attacks
    March 11, 2003
    Al Qaeda is seeking recruits in the Middle East for terrorist attacks on oil fields in Saudi Arabia and Kuwait in the event of U.S. military action against Iraq, U.S. intelligence officials say.

    Probe sought of French parts sales
    March 8, 2003
    The U.S. government should investigate reports that France allowed Iraq to obtain military equipment in violation of U.N. sanctions, a senior Republican senator said yesterday.

    Iraq strengthens air force with French parts
    March 7, 2003
    A French company has been selling spare parts to Iraq for its fighter jets and military helicopters during the past several months, according to U.S. intelligence officials.

    U.S. plans to make short work of Iraq
    March 5, 2003
    The U.S. military is planning a devastating bombing and missile attack on Iraq that will force the capitulation of the Iraqi government in a short period of time, the Pentagon's top general said yesterday.

    Bombers sent to Guam for North Korea threat
    March 5, 2003
    The Pentagon is sending B-1 and B-52 bombers to Guam in response to heightened tensions with North Korea as the State Department yesterday criticized North Korea's threatening aerial encounter on Sunday.

    North Korean jets lock on U.S. aircraft
    March 4, 2003
    North Korean fighter jets threatened an unarmed U.S. reconnaissance aircraft over the East Sea/Sea of Japan on Sunday, increasing tensions about Pyongyang's nuclear arms and missile programs.

    Terrorists aim at Pearl Harbor
    March 3, 2003
    Terrorists linked to al Qaeda have targeted U.S. military facilities in Pearl Harbor, including nuclear-powered submarines and ships, The Washington Times has learned.

    Bin Laden aide a mastermind of terror plots
    March 2, 2003
    Khalid Shaikh Mohammed is the highest-ranking al Qaeda leader captured so far in the war against international terrorism, U.S. officials said yesterday.

    North Korea tested a cruise missile
    February 27, 2003
    North Korea flight-tested a new long-range cruise missile Monday, not a short-range, 1950s-era weapon as first reported, U.S. intelligence officials said yesterday.

    Pyongyang restarts nuclear reactor
    February 27, 2003
    North Korea has restarted a nuclear reactor as part of its drive to resume building nuclear weapons, U.S. officials said yesterday.

    Saddam seen using proxy groups to attack the U.S.
    February 25, 2003
    A recent CIA analysis concluded Saddam Hussein is highly likely to use a "third party" terrorist group to conduct a proxy attack on the United States in advance of American military operations, according to U.S. officials.

    Saddam shifts jets from Baghdad
    February 21, 2003
    The Iraqi military has begun moving aircraft from bases near Baghdad to western Iraq in an effort to protect the warplanes from U.S. and allied bombing campaigns, according to U.S. intelligence officials.

    Ship gets arms in and out
    February 18, 2003
    The North Korean ship that last year delivered Scud missiles to Yemen transferred a large shipment of chemical weapons material from Germany to North Korea recently, U.S. intelligence officials said.

    Bin Laden son, al Qaeda terrorists spotted in Iran
    February 15, 2003
    U.S. intelligence agencies say Osama bin Laden's oldest son, Sad, is in Iran along with other senior al Qaeda terrorists, as Iranian military forces have been placed on their highest state of alert in anticipation of a U.S. attack on Iraq, according to intelligence officials.

    Ridge cautions against panic
    February 15, 2003
    Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge yesterday cautioned against panic over the government's decision to raise the national threat assessment to the second-highest level, saying preparing for a possible terrorist attack was proper but warning citizens not to "start sealing the doors and windows."

    Anti-aircraft missiles deployed to bases, around D.C.
    February 13, 2003
    The Pentagon has deployed air defense missiles around Washington as the CIA warned yesterday that Osama bin Laden's latest audio message could presage a major attack.

    FBI, CIA believe mass-casualty al Qaeda strike more likely
    February 11, 2003
    Al Qaeda's latest threat of terrorist attacks is focused on operations in three areas: the continental United States, the Persian Gulf region or Southeast Asia, according to intelligence officials.

    Classified data make case
    February 6, 2003
    U.S. intelligence intercepts on Iraq's efforts to hide banned weapons from the United Nations were the highlight yesterday of new information made public to bolster the Bush administration's case for military action to disarm Saddam Hussein.

    Powell will list Iraqi arms violations at U.N.
    February 5, 2003
    The Bush administration will disclose new information to the United Nations today on Iraq's mobile biological weapons facilities, as well as evidence linking Baghdad to the al Qaeda terrorist group, U.S. officials said.

    Orbiting supercameras aid search for shuttle debris
    February 5, 2003
    U.S. spy satellites are taking high-resolution photographs to help locate debris from the Space Shuttle Columbia, Defense Department officials said yesterday.

    Arrests of al Qaeda terrorists disrupt plans for attack
    February 4, 2003
    Al Qaeda is planning a mass-casualty attack to rival September 11, but preparations have been disrupted by arrests of terrorists during the past several months, according to U.S. intelligence officials.

    CIA advertising campaign aims to attract Chinese-Americans
    February 3, 2003
    The CIA has started a new advertising campaign to recruit Chinese-Americans as spies and analysts, as part of an effort to improve its operations against China.

    DIA fears Cuban mole aided Russia, China
    February 1, 2003
    A Cuban mole who operated at the highest levels of the Defense Intelligence Agency is likely to have helped Russia and China obtain pilfered intelligence secrets, according to a senior DIA official.

    Envoy lauds U.S. 'policing' of al Qaeda
    February 1, 2003
    The U.S.-led war on terrorism has been effective so far in "policing" al Qaeda extremists, but is not doing enough to root out the causes of terrorism over the long term, Pakistan's foreign minister said yesterday.

    China enacts law extending its control
    January 27, 2003
    China has enacted a new decree extending its control over a 200-mile economic zone from its coast that Bush administration officials say could lead to another clash with the United States over freedom of navigation.

    CIA head says agency not at fault for 9/11 lapses
    January 24, 2003
    U.S. intelligence agencies failed to stop the September 11 terrorist attacks despite the best efforts of analysts and spies to uncover the al Qaeda plot, the head of the CIA's espionage branch said yesterday.

    Top general questions loyalty of Iraqi troops
    January 23, 2003
    Saddam Hussein is trying to shore up the loyalty of his military forces amid signs that not all his troops will fight against a U.S.-led invasion, the nation's top military officer said yesterday.

    N. Korea using China to obtain missile supplies
    January 22, 2003
    North Korean companies in China are funneling technology and goods for Pyongyang's missile program, highlighting Beijing's mixed approach to the nuclear crisis on the Korean Peninsula.

    Ex-Los Alamos scientist called spy for China
    January 17, 2003
    A former Energy Department intelligence chief charges in his new book that fired Los Alamos nuclear scientist Wen Ho Lee provided sensitive weapons data to China during unreported meetings with nuclear-weapons scientists.

    U.S. sees nothing alarming in N. Korea going on alert
    January 16, 2003
    North Korea's military has been alerted to prepare to increase its combat readiness, but U.S. intelligence officials said the notice does not indicate an increased danger of conflict.

    Defense disputes racial imparity
    January 14, 2003
    The Pentagon yesterday disputed assertions by two congressmen who seek a reinstatement of the draft that blacks are assigned to disproportionate numbers of combat positions.

    New reports say Iraq holding U.S. pilot
    January 10, 2003
    The Defense Department recently obtained additional intelligence stating that a missing Navy pilot is alive and being held by the Iraqi government, according to U.S. officials.

    Two-layer defense for Baghdad
    January 7, 2003
    Iraqi military forces are setting up a two-layer defense ring around Baghdad in preparation for U.S. military action, according to U.S. intelligence officials.

    Israel asked to stop arms sales to China
    January 3, 2003
    The Bush administration has asked Israel to halt arms sales and technology transfers to China in a bid to reduce Beijing's growing military threat to Taiwan, U.S. officials said yesterday.

    U.S. suspects Iraq hides scientists
    December 31, 2002
    Iraq is hiding at least two weapons scientists in Saddam Hussein's presidential palaces, U.S. intelligence officials have told The Washington Times.

    Panel to probe China's nuclear-related sales
    December 20, 2002
    A congressionally mandated commission will investigate Beijing's sales of nuclear material to North Korea, as China's Foreign Ministry said yesterday that reports of the transfer are groundless.

    Pentagon plans defense against Mideast missiles
    December 19, 2002
    The Pentagon is planning to build a second missile-defense interceptor system near the East Coast or in Europe to counter missile threats from the Middle East, Bush administration officials said yesterday.

    Bush vows to build missile defenses
    December 18, 2002
    President Bush yesterday said the United States will build a defense system against ballistic missiles, citing the growing threat of catastrophic attack by terrorists and emerging nuclear-missile states.

    Bush approves missile defense
    December 17, 2002
    President Bush has decided to begin deploying by 2004 a nationwide defense system against ballistic missiles, The Washington Times has learned.

    China ships North Korea ingredient for nuclear arms
    December 17, 2002
    North Korea has purchased a large shipment of chemicals from China that can be used to make nuclear-weapons fuel, U.S. intelligence officials say.

    N. Korea delivers semi-submersible gunships to Iran
    December 16, 2002
    North Korea sent 15 gunboats to Iran last week aboard an Iranian freighter that arrived about the same time that U.S. and Spanish warships temporarily seized a shipment of North Korean Scud missiles, The Washington Times has learned.

    Kissinger abruptly quits panel on 9/11
    December 14, 2002
    Former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger resigned yesterday as chairman of a special commission set up to investigate intelligence and security failures related to the September 11 terrorist attacks.

    Al Qaeda leadership reported disrupted
    December 13, 2002

    U.S. military and intelligence forces have killed or captured a major portion of the al Qaeda leadership and several key successes were won in the past few months, according to CIA Director George J. Tenet.

    U.N. team to shield Iraq's arms suppliers
    December 12, 2002
    U.N. arms inspectors will not disclose the identities of foreign suppliers to Iraq's weapons programs, but past arms transfers have been sent from a range of companies in Russia and in China, as well as in Europe and the United States.

    North Korean ship seized
    December 11, 2002
    U.S. and allied warships have seized a North Korean ship in the Arabian Sea with a shipment of a dozen Scud missiles bound for Yemen.

    Chinese general told threat against U.S. unacceptable
    December 11, 2002
    The White House told a visiting Chinese general yesterday that comments he made in 1995 suggesting China would use nuclear weapons against Los Angeles were unacceptable.

    China's arms sales, stance on Taiwan chill talks with U.S.
    December 10, 2002
    Chinese military officials yesterday rebuffed questions about Beijing's arms sales to rogue states and refused to renounce the use of force to reunite Taiwan with the mainland, defense officials said yesterday.

    N. Korea seeks aid from China on nukes
    December 9, 2002
    North Korea is trying to buy a chemical from China used in the production of nuclear-weapons fuel that U.S. intelligence officials say is a sign the communist government in Pyongyang is continuing to secretly develop nuclear arms, The Washington Times has learned.

    U.S. set to cite Iraq for breach
    December 5, 2002
    The Bush administration is set to declare Iraq in violation of the U.N. resolution requiring Baghdad to give up weapons of mass destruction, The Washington Times has learned.

    U.S. drops leaflets to warn off repairers
    December 3, 2002
    Iraq was warned yesterday not to rebuild portions of a fiber-optic communications network bombed by U.S. and allied warplanes on Sunday.

    N. Korea ships fuel, missiles to Yemen
    December 2, 2002
    North Korea recently shipped missiles and fuel components to Yemen in a sign the Pyongyang government is continuing to act as the world's main missile supplier, The Washington Times has learned.

    Airlines warned of missile threat
    November 30, 2002
    Federal security agencies have warned U.S. airlines and airports to be alert for attacks from portable anti-aircraft missiles after an Israeli airliner was fired at this week in Kenya.

    Face of U.S. espionage changing
    November 27, 2002
    American spies are increasingly women and foreign-born citizens who succeed in passing secrets as volunteers, according to a Defense Department report on espionage.

    Thanksgiving brings terror alert but no credible threats
    November 27, 2002
    Law-enforcement and intelligence agencies are on alert for terrorist attacks during the Thanksgiving holiday, but they have not received specific, credible threats, U.S. officials said yesterday.

    North Korea can build nukes right now
    November 22, 2002
    North Korea could build several plutonium bombs right away and add one every year until about 2005 if the 1994 Agreed Framework collapses, a CIA analysis says.

    Attacks by Iraq termed 'breach'
    November 21, 2002
    Iraq's continued efforts to shoot down U.S. and allied warplanes patrolling no-fly zones over Iraq violate Baghdad's obligations under a new United Nations resolution, and will be responded to in an appropriate fashion, Pentagon officials said yesterday.

    Pentagon confirms 'snooping' system
    November 21, 2002
    The Pentagon yesterday confirmed that a high-tech data-collection system that will monitor credit-card transactions and airline ticket purchases, described by critics as "a supersnoop's dream," is being created to thwart terrorist attacks.

    Chinese missile has twice the range U.S. anticipated
    November 20, 2002
    China recently test-fired a new cruise missile with twice the range U.S. intelligence agencies initially estimated, intelligence officials say.

    U.S. forces almost ready for Saddam, Wolfowitz says
    November 17, 2002
    PALM BEACH, Fla. U.S. military forces are close to being ready to take military action against Saddam Hussein if the president calls on them, Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz said yesterday.

    Baghdad increases range of surface-to-air missiles
    November 15, 2002
    Iraq has boosted the range of some surface-to-air missiles as part of its ongoing efforts to shoot down patrolling U.S. and British warplanes, The Washington Times has learned.

    U.S. sees terrorism threat against country's oil ports
    November 13, 2002
    U.S. intelligence agencies have detected surveillance by terror suspects at three oil facilities in the United States, raising fears that plans are under way to attack oil-shipping terminals and refineries, according to U.S. intelligence officials.

    Heathrow target of al Qaeda
    November 13, 2002
    London's Heathrow Airport has been targeted for attack by al Qaeda terrorists, an Islamic radical arrested in London last month told investigators, according to U.S. intelligence officials.

    U.S. says tape shows bin Laden alive
    November 13, 2002
    U.S. officials said yesterday they strongly suspect a newly released tape by terrorist mastermind Osama bin Laden is authentic and provides the first hard proof in nearly a year that bin Laden is alive.

    Congressional watchdog to probe China-SEC relations
    November 12, 2002
    A congressionally mandated commission on China and security issues will investigate Beijing's approach to obtaining economically valuable data from the U.S. government, including the Securities and Exchange Commission, the commission's chairman said yesterday.

    SEC aide quits after leak to Chinese
    November 11, 2002
    An employee of the Securities and Exchange Commission was forced to resign after it was discovered she had sent sensitive data on American computer companies to China in what U.S. officials say may be a case of economic espionage, The Washington Times has learned.

    U.S. says Baghdad is hiding anthrax
    November 8, 2002
    U.S. intelligence agencies have told U.N. weapons inspectors that Iraq has hidden 7,000 liters of anthrax, but chief inspector Hans Blix never reported the information to the U.N. Security Council, The Washington Times has learned.

    U.N. allowed Iraqi purchase of agent usable for weapons
    November 6, 2002
    The United Nations overruled U.S. government objections and allowed Iraq to buy a specialty chemical that U.S. intelligence officials say will boost Baghdad's chemical and biological warfare agents.

    N. Korea missile threat increases
    November 1, 2002
    North Korea is continuing to develop long-range missiles that threaten the United States and a basic defense system against them is about two years from deployment, the Pentagon's missile-defense chief said yesterday.

    Pentagon takes over program to gather intelligence on Iraq
    November 1, 2002
    The Pentagon has rescued an intelligence-collection program in northern Iraq from critics in the Senate and State Department who held up U.S. funds for an Iraqi opposition group that has scored major successes in getting information from defecting government officials in Baghdad.

    Lawmakers ask Bush to end accord
    October 31, 2002
    Five members of Congress yesterday urged President Bush to scrap the 1994 nuclear agreement with North Korea because of Pyongyang's recent admission that it had a covert nuclear arms program.

    Saddam safe on home front, CIA says
    October 29, 2002
    Saddam Hussein's hold on power in Iraq remains strong and his military forces can defeat any internal opposition, according to a CIA analysis.

    Opium-based gas suspected in Moscow
    October 29, 2002
    Deadly gas used by Russian security forces during a raid on a Moscow theater was most likely an opium-based incapacitating agent, U.S. officials and private experts said yesterday.

    U.S.- China talks likely to resume
    October 25, 2002
    The Pentagon is preparing to resume a high-level strategic dialogue with China's military that was put on hold after a U.S. EP-3 surveillance aircraft and a Chinese jet collided last year, defense officials said.

    Saddam recalls children of envoys
    October 24, 2002
    Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein has ordered all his diplomats posted abroad to send their children back to Iraq, according to a U.S. intelligence report.

    Ashcroft decides no new laws needed to stop security leaks
    October 24, 2002
    No new laws are needed to punish government officials for leaking classified information, a Justice Department Task Force has concluded.

    Initiative sees medicine as way to beat terrorism
    October 23, 2002
    A new humanitarian organization is fighting terrorism at the village level by providing medical care to impoverished Muslims in the southern Philippines.

    Navy officer loses suit against Russians
    October 19, 2002
    A federal jury in Seattle yesterday ruled against a Navy intelligence officer who sued a Russian shipping company over a 1997 surveillance mission that left his eyes damaged from a laser.

    U.S. saw North Korea's work to enrich fuel for nukes
    October 18, 2002
    North Korea has been working covertly to develop an enrichment capability for nuclear weapons for at least five years and has used technology obtained from Pakistan and other nations, according to U.S. officials.

    CIA's director tells Hill panel: 'We made mistakes'
    October 18, 2002
    CIA Director George Tenet told Congress yesterday that U.S. intelligence agencies failed to stop the September 11 attacks but insisted it is not possible to expect 100 percent success in fighting terrorism.

    Iraq seeks chemical for arms
    October 16, 2002
    A Chinese state-run company is talking with Iraq about selling a chemical used in making missile fuel, although no transfer has been spotted, according to U.S. intelligence officials.

    U.S. 'in the dark' on bin Laden note
    October 15, 2002
    U.S. intelligence agencies are investigating whether a statement from Osama bin Laden made public yesterday is authentic and can prove that the elusive al Qaeda terrorist leader is alive.

    Navy says Gulf war pilot held by Iraq
    October 12, 2002
    The Navy changed the status of a pilot missing since the 1991 Persian Gulf war to "missing in action, captured" yesterday, effectively making Capt. Michael Scott Speicher an Iraqi prisoner of war.

    Hill prober cites Clinton-era failures against al Qaeda
    October 9, 2002
    Covert intelligence operations against Osama bin Laden and military attacks during the Clinton administration failed to disrupt the al Qaeda network in Afghanistan, a congressional investigator told Congress yesterday

    U.S. says al Qaeda exploring Russian market for weapons
    October 8, 2002
    U.S. intelligence agencies are concerned that terrorists are working hard to acquire small nuclear weapons and nuclear material for bombs from Russia.

    'Bin Laden tape' being analyzed for validity
    October 8, 2002
    Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said yesterday that an audiotape broadcast Sunday purporting to be of Osama bin Laden warning of more al Qaeda terrorist attacks is being analyzed, and he emphasized that the war on terrorism isn't just about the Saudi terrorist leader.

    Trial aims to tie Russia to laser attack
    October 7, 2002
    A U.S. Navy intelligence officer is set for trial in a case that seeks to prove that someone on a Russian merchant ship fired a laser that permanently damaged his eyes during a 1997 surveillance mission.

    CIA sees Iraq with nukes by decade's end
    October 5, 2002
    Iraq has stockpiles of chemical and biological weapons in violation of U.N. resolutions and could deploy a nuclear bomb by the end of this decade, the CIA said in a report made public yesterday.

    Reports fail to reform intelligence agencies
    October 4, 2002
    Numerous studies over the past several decades have called for reforms that could improve U.S. intelligence capabilities, but they produced few changes or improvements, a congressional investigator said yesterday.

    Alert on hijackers not 'urgent'
    October 2, 2002
    Two terrorists who were on the hijacked airliner that hit the Pentagon might have been located before September 11 but the FBI and CIA did not alert immigration officials of the danger they posed, a congressional investigator said yesterday.

    Investigator says FBI, CIA mishandled leads on attacks
    September 25, 2002
    The FBI and CIA mishandled key intelligence and investigative leads that could have led to unraveling the September 11 terrorist plot before it was carried out, a congressional investigator disclosed yesterday.

    U.S. officials probe role of Sudan pilot
    September 21, 2002
    U.S. authorities have detained a Sudanese pilot suspected of plotting to fly a hijacked airliner into the White House, U.S. officials said yesterday.

    Agent: FBI never got 9/11 data
    September 21, 2002
    An FBI agent told Congress yesterday that days before September 11 he complained to FBI headquarters that "someone will die" because senior bureau officials refused to permit him to pursue one of the men who later took part in the Pentagon suicide attack.

    U.S. eyes pilot with ties to al Qaeda
    September 20, 2002
    U.S. intelligence agencies are looking for a missing Sudanese air force pilot who is said to be planning to hijack an airliner and fly it into the White House.

    Pentagon official urges broader focus for intelligence
    September 20, 2002
    U.S. intelligence agencies need to focus on terrorist groups as closely as they do nation-states, a senior Pentagon official told a congressional panel yesterday.

    Few CIA analysts put on al Qaeda case
    September 19, 2002
    CIA Director George J. Tenet declared "war" on Osama bin Laden's al Qaeda network in 1998 but had only five agency analysts assigned to study the group at the time of the September 11 terrorist attacks, Congress was told yesterday.

    Terror cells at liberty to strike
    September 18, 2002
    Information obtained from self-professed September 11 organizer Ramzi Binalshibh indicates al Qaeda has decentralized its leadership structure, making it more dangerous, according to U.S. officials.

    Allied warplanes expand counterattacks
    September 17, 2002
    The Pentagon has ordered expanded retaliatory attacks on air-defense targets in Iraq in response to threats to patrolling U.S. and British warplanes, senior officials said yesterday.

    Joint Chiefs boss cites Iraqi dangers
    September 14, 2002
    The Pentagon is expected to transfer the headquarters of the U.S. Central Command to the Persian Gulf, and Iraq is working on mobile-germ and poison-gas facilities the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said yesterday.

    6 in custody in terror probe in Baltimore
    September 12, 2002
    U.S. security agencies remained on heightened alert through the anniversary of September 11 as terrorist suspects were arrested in Baltimore and a freighter emitting radiation was stopped in New Jersey

    Jailed al Qaeda figure is source for latest threat alert
    September 11, 2002
    New information from a senior al Qaeda operative now being held by a foreign government prompted the unprecedented triggering of an alert system that characterizes the danger of a terrorist attack as high.

    Heightened alert official demeanor on infamous day
    September 10, 2002
    The White House is concerned about a possible terrorist attack coinciding with the first anniversary of the September 11 attack but there are no specific threats, a spokesman said yesterday.

    'Staking' arouses terror suspicions
    September 9, 2002
    U.S. national security agencies are on alert for a terrorist attack after the discovery that a Middle Eastern man carried out suspicious surveillance of the Washington Monument, the Pentagon and other buildings in the area.

    Afghanistan lessons don't apply to Iraq, general says
    August 22, 2002
    New war-fighting methods used on the Taliban in Afghanistan would not apply to Iraq, which could prove to be a more formidable foe in any military action to oust Saddam Hussein, the commandant of the Marine Corps said yesterday.

    Rumsfeld says al Qaeda in Iraq
    August 21, 2002
    Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said yesterday that al Qaeda terrorists are inside Iraq almost certainly with the support of the government in Baghdad.

    Iraqi germ plant active
    August 14, 2002
    U.S. intelligence agencies spotted activity at an Iraqi factory last week that is increasing fears that Saddam Hussein is advancing his germ-weapons program, The Washington Times has learned.

    Biochemical weapons boost Iraq's military might
    August 3, 2002
    Eleven years after its defeat in the Persian Gulf war, Iraq's military forces are smaller but more potent because of secret stockpiles of chemical and biological weapons.

    China pursues arsenal of technology
    July 31, 2002
    China is developing high-technology arms, including laser weapons and radio-frequency bombs, to boost its ability to successfully carry out warfare against the United States and other advanced military powers, according to a recent Pentagon report.

    Rumsfeld targets Saddam, but not other 'axis' regimes
    July 31, 2002
    Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said yesterday that the United States is not seeking to oust the dictatorial regimes in Iran, North Korea and other states in the same way it wants to overthrow Iraq's Saddam Hussein.

    Iraq seeks steel for nukes
    July 26, 2002
    Iraq's government is trying to buy special equipment used in producing fuel for nuclear weapons, The Washington Times has learned.

    Firms in arms sales to Iran identified
    July 26, 2002
    The State Department has identified the eight Chinese companies and two men it punished with economic sanctions last week for selling arms to Iran.

    China tests missile
    July 23, 2002
    China recently test-fired a medium-range missile that contained numerous dummy warheads designed to defeat missile defenses, according to U.S. intelligence officials.

    U.S. confirms weapons-sales sanctions
    July 20, 2002
    The State Department announced yesterday it is sanctioning eight companies and two persons for selling weapons components to Iran in violation of U.S. arms-proliferation laws.

    U.S. penalizes 8 Chinese firms
    July 19, 2002
    The United States is imposing economic sanctions on eight Chinese companies for selling destabilizing arms and germ-weapons materials to Iran, The Washington Times has learned.

    Senators want more air missiles for Taiwan
    July 18, 2002
    The United States should send advanced air-launch missiles to Taiwan based on China's recent test firing of similar missiles, four U.S. senators said in a letter to the State Department.

    Chinese buildup targets Taiwan
    July 13, 2002
    China's military is engaged in a threatening buildup that includes extending the range of its nuclear missiles and developing forces to coerce and attack Taiwan, according to a Pentagon report on Chinese military power.

    Bush administration backs off Iraq POW mission
    July 12, 2002
    The Bush administration will send a diplomatic note, but not a team of people, to Iraq as part of efforts to resolve the fate of missing Navy pilot Lt. Cmdr. Michael Scott Speicher.

    Al Qaeda remains a silent menace in U.S., senators say
    July 12, 2002
    The al Qaeda terrorist group is regrouping and is working secretly inside the United States, the chairman and vice chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence said yesterday.

    5,000 in U.S. suspected of ties to al Qaeda
    July 11, 2002
    U.S. intelligence agencies are watching several groups of Middle Eastern men thought to be part of an infrastructure of as many as 5,000 al Qaeda terrorists and their supporters in the United States, The Washington Times has learned.

    U.S. eyes missile transfer to Taipei
    July 4, 2002
    The Bush administration is reviewing whether to send advanced air-to-air missiles that were purchased by Taiwan but not delivered because of fears of upsetting the military balance in the region, U.S. officials said yesterday.

    China deploys drones from Israel
    July 2, 2002
    U.S. intelligence agencies have identified an Israeli-made anti-radar weapon deployed with Chinese forces opposite Taiwan, The Washington Times has learned.

    Missile defense system has no target date
    July 2, 2002
    The threat from long-range missiles continues to grow, but the Pentagon will not set an exact date for when the United States will deploy a missile defense system, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld says.

    China test-fires new missile
    July 1, 2002
    China's air force test-fired a new air-to-air missile for the first time last week in a move that has altered the military balance across the Taiwan Strait, defense officials say.

    Defense facilities to disperse
    June 28, 2002
    Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said yesterday that he wants to impose limits on new defense construction within 100 miles of the Pentagon.

    Chinese jet fighters fly near U.S. spy plane
    June 27, 2002
    Two Chinese jet fighters came within 150 feet of a U.S. reconnaissance aircraft near China in the first close encounter since a collision last year between an EP-3 and a Chinese jet, The Washington Times has learned.

    Pentagon expedites missile-defense plan
    June 26, 2002
    The Pentagon is rapidly moving ahead with deploying a new defense system in the next few years that can knock out enemy missiles, the general in charge of the program said yesterday.

    Rumsfeld declines Beijing invitation to visit
    June 22, 2002
    Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said yesterday he will not accept China's invitation to visit the country, but will send a representative to discuss resuming military exchanges with the Chinese army.

    U.S. agencies doubt terrorist Atta's meeting in Prague
    June 19, 2002
    U.S. intelligence officials say they have not seen evidence from the Czech government to confirm reports accepted by the State Department that a key al Qaeda terrorist met with an Iraqi agent in Prague five months before September 11.

    FBI searches L.A. coast for al Qaeda crew, cache
    June 18, 2002
    Federal authorities have been searching for a merchant ship carrying a group of al Qaeda terrorists and a large cache of weapons that is believed to be headed for Los Angeles, The Washington Times has learned.

    FBI makes spy-catching priority, topped only by counterterrorism
    June 17, 2002
    The FBI is stepping up efforts to catch foreign spies in the United States as agents from China, Russia and other countries are increasing intelligence activities here, according to the FBI's top counterspy.

    Radical Islam called worst foe
    June 6, 2002
    The ideological battle against radical Islam over time is as important to winning the war on terrorism as arresting and killing terrorists is right now, Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz said yesterday.

    Congress poised to probe intelligence failures
    June 5, 2002
    Congress held its first hearing yesterday on the intelligence failures surrounding the September 11 attacks amid finger-pointing by the CIA and FBI over what was known in advance of the terrorist strikes.

    U.S. nabs cache of portable missiles
    June 1, 2002
    U.S. military forces in Afghanistan captured a cache of 30 anti-aircraft missiles, Pentagon officials said yesterday as a new American general took control of the U.S.-led campaign there.

    Missiles smuggled into U.S.
    May 31, 2002
    The U.S. government has alerted airlines and law enforcement agencies that new intelligence indicates that Islamic terrorists have smuggled shoulder-fired anti-aircraft missiles into the United States.

    Exporting weapons draws U.S. sanctions
    May 20, 2002
    Chinese and European arms exporters were hit with U.S. economic sanctions for selling cruise missile and chemical weapons goods to Iran, The Washington Times has learned.

    China's military starts war games near Taiwan
    May 18, 2002
    Chinese military forces opposite Taiwan have been placed on the highest state of alert as Beijing begins large-scale annual war games, according to U.S. intelligence officials.

    For years, signs suggested 'that something was up'
    May 17, 2002
    U.S. intelligence agencies had indications for months and even years before September 11 that terrorists were planning attacks with aircraft.

    U.S. finds two large caches of weapons
    May 15, 2002
    U.S. military forces in Afghanistan have found two large caches of arms that were stashed by al Qaeda and Taliban fighters, Pentagon officials said yesterday.

    Security boosted at nuke facilities
    May 14, 2002
    The Bush administration has taken steps to tighten security at U.S. nuclear power facilities based on documents and information obtained from al Qaeda terrorists in Afghanistan, a White House spokesman said yesterday.

    U.S. weighs July 4 threat
    May 13, 2002
    Islamic terrorists are planning an attack against a U.S. nuclear power plant to coincide with the July 4 celebrations, U.S. intelligence sources say.

    Iraq deploys missiles, violates no-fly zones
    May 10, 2002
    U.S. intelligence agencies have identified new surface-to-air missile batteries near Nasariya in southern Iraq, and Iraqi military pilots are increasingly violating no-fly zones created by the United Nations, U.S. intelligence officials say.

    U.S. imposes sanctions for Iran weapon aid
    May 10, 2002
    The State Department yesterday announced it is imposing economic sanctions on Chinese, Armenian and Moldovan companies for selling weapons-related goods to Iran.

    Missiles bolstered opposite Taiwan
    April 29, 2002
    China delivered a new shipment of missiles to bases near Taiwan last week as part of a mounting buildup under way since the beginning of the year, U.S. intelligence officials said.

    China-made artillery seized in Afghanistan
    April 12, 2002
    More than 100 Chinese artillery rockets found in Afghanistan were either smuggled into the country from China or sent years ago during the Soviet military occupation, U.S. officials said yesterday.

    White House backs strong defense of Taiwan
    April 11, 2002
    The Bush administration will do "whatever it takes" to defend Taiwan from military strikes by China, according to a recent closed-door speech by Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz that drew an angry response from China yesterday.

    U.S. to search for pilot in Iraq
    April 10, 2002
    The Bush administration is ready to dispatch a team of experts to Iraq to investigate the fate of missing Persian Gulf war pilot Lt. Cmdr. Michael Scott Speicher, defense officials said yesterday.

    Terrorists trained by Iran tracked from Uzbekistan
    April 8, 2002
    Iran is secretly training Islamic terrorists from Uzbekistan for future operations in Central Asia, according to U.S. intelligence officials.

    Chinese missiles concern Pentagon
    April 3, 2002
    China's buildup of short-range missiles near its southeastern coast is "threatening" to Taiwan and poses a danger to sea lanes and ports in the region, the Pentagon said yesterday.

    China assembles missiles near coast facing Taiwan
    April 2, 2002
    China's military is deploying more short-range ballistic missiles near the coast opposite Taiwan, as tensions in the region are increasing over growing U.S. support for the island.

    Suspected friendly fire deaths probed
    March 30, 2002
    A U.S. soldier who died during a recent mop-up operation in Afghanistan may have been killed by friendly U.S. fire, the commander of U.S. forces in Afghanistan said yesterday.

    Iraq again welcomes probe of U.S. pilot downed in war
    March 28, 2002
    The Iraqi government yesterday repeated its offer to allow a U.S. team of inspectors to visit Iraq and resolve the fate of missing U.S. Navy pilot Lt. Cmdr. Michael Scott Speicher.

    Iraqi radio carried U.S. pilot offer
    March 27, 2002
    Iraq's offer to allow a U.S. team to investigate the fate of Navy Lt. Cmdr. Michael Scott Speicher was carried by the government radio not just by Chinese and British wire services, as Bush administration officials asserted Monday.

    White House mulls Iraqi offer to allow search for pilot
    March 26, 2002
    The Bush administration is studying an announced Iraqi government offer to have U.S. inspectors visit the country to resolve the fate of a U.S. Navy pilot missing since the Persian Gulf war.

    Pentagon 'leaning forward' on controlling Afghan drugs
    March 26, 2002
    Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said yesterday the Pentagon is "leaning forward" on drug control in post-Taliban Afghanistan, but said using the U.S. military to eradicate poppy fields is only one option.

    Military opposes spraying poppies
    March 25, 2002
    The U.S. military is opposing Bush administration plans to conduct crop eradication in Afghanistan, where poppy cultivation in the coming weeks will net millions of dollars for Taliban and al Qaeda drug runners, U.S. officials say.

    N. Korea gunboat shipment helps Iran expand military
    March 20, 2002
    North Korea is sending a shipment of gunboats to Iran that U.S. intelligence agencies say will be converted into guided-missile warships.

    Search for pilot given priority
    March 20, 2002
    The director of the Defense Intelligence Agency told Congress yesterday his agency is tracking down every possible lead concerning a U.S. pilot lost in combat over Iraq in 1991.

    CIA won't rule out Iraq, Iran
    March 20, 2002
    CIA Director George J. Tenet yesterday refused to rule out the involvement of either Iraq or Iran in the September 11 terrorist attacks.

    Missing pilot's status in question
    March 16, 2002
    Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said yesterday the Pentagon is investigating whether a Navy pilot shot down in the Persian Gulf war is alive in Iraq.

    Spy agencies say pilot likely seized
    March 15, 2002
    A U.S. intelligence report on the case of Navy Lt. Cmdr. Michael Scott Speicher provides the most complete explanation by the U.S. government on why the pilot probably was captured alive by Iraqis after ejecting from his F-18 in 1991.

    Pentagon asks Iraq about U.S. pilot
    March 13, 2002
    The Pentagon called on Iraq yesterday to reveal what it knows about the fate of a missing U.S. Navy pilot shot down near Baghdad in 1991.

    Senator suspects pilot alive in Iraq
    March 12, 2002
    A member of the Senate Intelligence Committee said yesterday he suspects a Navy pilot shot down over Iraq in 1991 is alive and being held captive as the State Department said Baghdad has ignored U.S. requests for information about the pilot's fate.

    Pilot believed alive, held in Iraq
    March 11, 2002
    U.S. intelligence agencies have obtained new information indicating Iraq is holding captive a U.S. Navy pilot shot down during the Persian Gulf war, The Washington Times has learned.



America is at war... but most Americans don't know it. Find out now.

Now on sale! Buy the new book on information warfare by Bill Gertz

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    Now on Sale!

    Trade secrets on the news business from one of America's most experienced news reporters -- Bill Gertz

    Buy 'Covering Washington'


    Revised and Updated Softcover Edition

    Buy 'Breakdown'


    Excerpts from
    Breakdown: The Failure of American Intelligence to Defeat Global Terror

    Part 1: Military analyst's terror warning fell on deaf ears

    Part 2: Legal concerns make the CIA 'risk averse'

    Part 3: Too much focus on being cops



    Click Here To Buy a Copy of the hardcover edition of
    'Breakdown: How America's Intelligence Failures Led to September 11'
    at a 30 Percent Discount
    from Amazon.com

    Buy 'Breakdown'

    Praise for Breakdown:

    "Bill Gertz has written a first-rate analysis of the most serious problem to confront the nation since the Cold War, and it reads like a thriller. You won't be able to put it down. But when you do, send it to your congressman or senator."
    -- Richard Perle, Fellow, American Enterprise Institute, and former Assistant Secretary of Defense.

    "A deeply disturbing account of how America's intelligence agencies failed to discern the elaborate plots of Osama bin Laden's men were planning against us. Exciting. Upsetting. Strongly recommended."
    -- Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, Leavey Professor of Government, Georgetown University, and former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations.

    "Bill Gertz, one of America's most accomplished and credible investigative reporters, offers a compelling analysis of our nation's intelligence problems, including their historical roots, and provides a comprehensive prescription for correcting the deficiencies and improving national security."
    -- Edwin Meese III, former Attorney General of the United States.

    "A great read."
    -- John McLaughlin, host, "One on One"


    Eyes Wide Shut
    Washington Times book review by Joshua Sinai

    'Breakdown': A Catastrophic Failure to Think the Unthinkable
    New York Times book review by Sam Roberts

    Intelligence: A smarter route
    By Edwin J. Feulner


    CNN/Time Poll:
    Did U.S. Intelligence Agencies Fail on 9/11?

    September 2002
    Yes: 65 percent
    No: 31 percent

    September 2001
    Yes: 55 percent
    No: 38 percent

    (Poll conducted August 28-29, 2002 Sampling error: +/-3% pts)



    Available in both hardcover and soft cover edition

    Click here to purchase 'The China Threat: How the People's Republic Targets America'
    at a 30 Percent Discount from Amazon.com

    Buy 'The China Threat'

    Excerpts from 'The China Threat'
    in The Washington Times

    Part I: Beijing's spies gain access to secrets
    Part II: Clinton critic says he was targeted
    Part III: China prepares for war with U.S. over Taiwan

    The New Cold War
    Washington Times book review by Steven Mosher

    Wire stories about 'The China Threat'

    Reviews:

    "There is no Churchill in America today. Where are they to turn then, those patriots in our security services who understand what the fecklessness, stupidity and corruption of the Clinton administration are costing us? It would not be very surprising if they were to seek out a sympathetic journalist, in the slim hope that the American public might take their eyes away from Hollywood and Wall Street long enough to pay attention. If so, their contact of choice would be Bill Gertz, defense reporter for the Washington Times."
    -- John Derbyshire, National Review, Dec. 4, 2000

    "The China Threat is especially strong in piecing together the larger pattern of modernization in the Chinese military and the looming U.S.-China confrontation over Taiwan."
    -- Tom Donnelly, The Weekly Standard, Dec. 4, 2000

    "Sheer fabrication out of ulterior motives, with which we express our strong dissatisfaction. It must be pointed out that there are always some people in the United States who cling to the Cold War mentality and have prejudice of and hostility against China... We demand those who have plotted the so-called 'China Spy Case' see clearly the trend of history and immediately stop their despicable acts of wantonly attacking China."
    -- Sun Yuxi, spokesman for the Foreign Ministry, People's Republic of China, Nov. 16, 2000




    Available in both hardcover and soft cover edition

    Click here to purchase 'Betrayal: How the Clinton Administration Undermined American Security'
    from Amazon.com at a 30 Percent Discount

    Buy 'Betrayal'

    Praise for Betrayal
    "This will be the Clinton administration's least favorite book on its foreign policy. But the rebuttals are likely to be long on adjectives and short on refutation, for these tough charges are backed, the Gertz way, by fact after fact after fact."
    -- R. James Woolsey, former CIA Director

    "Mr. Gertz has performed a signal service by writing this thorough, frightening, and sad chronicle of how we fell from our ability to provide leadership in the quest for peace without appeasement."
    -- The Honorable Caspar Weinberger, former Secretary of Defense, Chairman of Forbes magazine

    "I know of no national security reporter in the U.S. who is better sourced or more respected for accuracy than Bill Gertz. His reporting is essential reading for those who wish to stay in the know. An so is Betrayal."
    -- James Webb, former Secretary of the Navy, author of Fields of Fire and The Emperor's General



    Revised and Updated Softcover Edition

    Buy 'Breakdown'


    Excerpts from
    Breakdown: The Failure of American Intelligence to Defeat Global Terror

    Part 1: Military analyst's terror warning fell on deaf ears

    Part 2: Legal concerns make the CIA 'risk averse'

    Part 3: Too much focus on being cops



    Click Here To Buy a Copy of the hardcover edition of
    'Breakdown: How America's Intelligence Failures Led to September 11'
    at a 30 Percent Discount
    from Amazon.com

    Buy 'Breakdown'

    Praise for Breakdown:

    "Bill Gertz has written a first-rate analysis of the most serious problem to confront the nation since the Cold War, and it reads like a thriller. You won't be able to put it down. But when you do, send it to your congressman or senator."
    -- Richard Perle, Fellow, American Enterprise Institute, and former Assistant Secretary of Defense.

    "A deeply disturbing account of how America's intelligence agencies failed to discern the elaborate plots of Osama bin Laden's men were planning against us. Exciting. Upsetting. Strongly recommended."
    -- Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, Leavey Professor of Government, Georgetown University, and former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations.

    "Bill Gertz, one of America's most accomplished and credible investigative reporters, offers a compelling analysis of our nation's intelligence problems, including their historical roots, and provides a comprehensive prescription for correcting the deficiencies and improving national security."
    -- Edwin Meese III, former Attorney General of the United States.

    "A great read."
    -- John McLaughlin, host, "One on One"


    Eyes Wide Shut
    Washington Times book review by Joshua Sinai

    'Breakdown': A Catastrophic Failure to Think the Unthinkable
    New York Times book review by Sam Roberts

    Intelligence: A smarter route
    By Edwin J. Feulner


    CNN/Time Poll:
    Did U.S. Intelligence Agencies Fail on 9/11?

    September 2002
    Yes: 65 percent
    No: 31 percent

    September 2001
    Yes: 55 percent
    No: 38 percent

    (Poll conducted August 28-29, 2002 Sampling error: +/-3% pts)



    Available in both hardcover and soft cover edition

    Click here to purchase 'The China Threat: How the People's Republic Targets America'
    at a 30 Percent Discount from Amazon.com

    Buy 'The China Threat'

    Excerpts from 'The China Threat'
    in The Washington Times

    Part I: Beijing's spies gain access to secrets
    Part II: Clinton critic says he was targeted
    Part III: China prepares for war with U.S. over Taiwan

    The New Cold War
    Washington Times book review by Steven Mosher

    Wire stories about 'The China Threat'

    Reviews:

    "There is no Churchill in America today. Where are they to turn then, those patriots in our security services who understand what the fecklessness, stupidity and corruption of the Clinton administration are costing us? It would not be very surprising if they were to seek out a sympathetic journalist, in the slim hope that the American public might take their eyes away from Hollywood and Wall Street long enough to pay attention. If so, their contact of choice would be Bill Gertz, defense reporter for the Washington Times."
    -- John Derbyshire, National Review, Dec. 4, 2000

    "The China Threat is especially strong in piecing together the larger pattern of modernization in the Chinese military and the looming U.S.-China confrontation over Taiwan."
    -- Tom Donnelly, The Weekly Standard, Dec. 4, 2000

    "Sheer fabrication out of ulterior motives, with which we express our strong dissatisfaction. It must be pointed out that there are always some people in the United States who cling to the Cold War mentality and have prejudice of and hostility against China... We demand those who have plotted the so-called 'China Spy Case' see clearly the trend of history and immediately stop their despicable acts of wantonly attacking China."
    -- Sun Yuxi, spokesman for the Foreign Ministry, People's Republic of China, Nov. 16, 2000




    Available in both hardcover and soft cover edition

    Click here to purchase 'Betrayal: How the Clinton Administration Undermined American Security'
    from Amazon.com at a 30 Percent Discount

    Buy 'Betrayal'

    Praise for Betrayal
    "This will be the Clinton administration's least favorite book on its foreign policy. But the rebuttals are likely to be long on adjectives and short on refutation, for these tough charges are backed, the Gertz way, by fact after fact after fact."
    -- R. James Woolsey, former CIA Director

    "Mr. Gertz has performed a signal service by writing this thorough, frightening, and sad chronicle of how we fell from our ability to provide leadership in the quest for peace without appeasement."
    -- The Honorable Caspar Weinberger, former Secretary of Defense, Chairman of Forbes magazine

    "I know of no national security reporter in the U.S. who is better sourced or more respected for accuracy than Bill Gertz. His reporting is essential reading for those who wish to stay in the know. An so is Betrayal."
    -- James Webb, former Secretary of the Navy, author of Fields of Fire and The Emperor's General



    Revised and Updated Softcover Edition

    Buy 'Breakdown'


    Excerpts from
    Breakdown: The Failure of American Intelligence to Defeat Global Terror

    Part 1: Military analyst's terror warning fell on deaf ears

    Part 2: Legal concerns make the CIA 'risk averse'

    Part 3: Too much focus on being cops



    Click Here To Buy a Copy of the hardcover edition of
    'Breakdown: How America's Intelligence Failures Led to September 11'
    at a 30 Percent Discount
    from Amazon.com

    Buy 'Breakdown'

    Praise for Breakdown:

    "Bill Gertz has written a first-rate analysis of the most serious problem to confront the nation since the Cold War, and it reads like a thriller. You won't be able to put it down. But when you do, send it to your congressman or senator."
    -- Richard Perle, Fellow, American Enterprise Institute, and former Assistant Secretary of Defense.

    "A deeply disturbing account of how America's intelligence agencies failed to discern the elaborate plots of Osama bin Laden's men were planning against us. Exciting. Upsetting. Strongly recommended."
    -- Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, Leavey Professor of Government, Georgetown University, and former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations.

    "Bill Gertz, one of America's most accomplished and credible investigative reporters, offers a compelling analysis of our nation's intelligence problems, including their historical roots, and provides a comprehensive prescription for correcting the deficiencies and improving national security."
    -- Edwin Meese III, former Attorney General of the United States.

    "A great read."
    -- John McLaughlin, host, "One on One"


    Eyes Wide Shut
    Washington Times book review by Joshua Sinai

    'Breakdown': A Catastrophic Failure to Think the Unthinkable
    New York Times book review by Sam Roberts

    Intelligence: A smarter route
    By Edwin J. Feulner


    CNN/Time Poll:
    Did U.S. Intelligence Agencies Fail on 9/11?

    September 2002
    Yes: 65 percent
    No: 31 percent

    September 2001
    Yes: 55 percent
    No: 38 percent

    (Poll conducted August 28-29, 2002 Sampling error: +/-3% pts)



    Available in both hardcover and soft cover edition

    Click here to purchase 'The China Threat: How the People's Republic Targets America'
    at a 30 Percent Discount from Amazon.com

    Buy 'The China Threat'

    Excerpts from 'The China Threat'
    in The Washington Times

    Part I: Beijing's spies gain access to secrets
    Part II: Clinton critic says he was targeted
    Part III: China prepares for war with U.S. over Taiwan

    The New Cold War
    Washington Times book review by Steven Mosher

    Wire stories about 'The China Threat'

    Reviews:

    "There is no Churchill in America today. Where are they to turn then, those patriots in our security services who understand what the fecklessness, stupidity and corruption of the Clinton administration are costing us? It would not be very surprising if they were to seek out a sympathetic journalist, in the slim hope that the American public might take their eyes away from Hollywood and Wall Street long enough to pay attention. If so, their contact of choice would be Bill Gertz, defense reporter for the Washington Times."
    -- John Derbyshire, National Review, Dec. 4, 2000

    "The China Threat is especially strong in piecing together the larger pattern of modernization in the Chinese military and the looming U.S.-China confrontation over Taiwan."
    -- Tom Donnelly, The Weekly Standard, Dec. 4, 2000

    "Sheer fabrication out of ulterior motives, with which we express our strong dissatisfaction. It must be pointed out that there are always some people in the United States who cling to the Cold War mentality and have prejudice of and hostility against China... We demand those who have plotted the so-called 'China Spy Case' see clearly the trend of history and immediately stop their despicable acts of wantonly attacking China."
    -- Sun Yuxi, spokesman for the Foreign Ministry, People's Republic of China, Nov. 16, 2000




    Available in both hardcover and soft cover edition

    Click here to purchase 'Betrayal: How the Clinton Administration Undermined American Security'
    from Amazon.com at a 30 Percent Discount

    Buy 'Betrayal'

    Praise for Betrayal
    "This will be the Clinton administration's least favorite book on its foreign policy. But the rebuttals are likely to be long on adjectives and short on refutation, for these tough charges are backed, the Gertz way, by fact after fact after fact."
    -- R. James Woolsey, former CIA Director

    "Mr. Gertz has performed a signal service by writing this thorough, frightening, and sad chronicle of how we fell from our ability to provide leadership in the quest for peace without appeasement."
    -- The Honorable Caspar Weinberger, former Secretary of Defense, Chairman of Forbes magazine

    "I know of no national security reporter in the U.S. who is better sourced or more respected for accuracy than Bill Gertz. His reporting is essential reading for those who wish to stay in the know. An so is Betrayal."
    -- James Webb, former Secretary of the Navy, author of Fields of Fire and The Emperor's General



    Revised and Updated Softcover Edition

    Buy 'Breakdown'


    Excerpts from
    Breakdown: The Failure of American Intelligence to Defeat Global Terror

    Part 1: Military analyst's terror warning fell on deaf ears

    Part 2: Legal concerns make the CIA 'risk averse'

    Part 3: Too much focus on being cops



    Click Here To Buy a Copy of the hardcover edition of
    'Breakdown: How America's Intelligence Failures Led to September 11'
    at a 30 Percent Discount
    from Amazon.com

    Buy 'Breakdown'

    Praise for Breakdown:

    "Bill Gertz has written a first-rate analysis of the most serious problem to confront the nation since the Cold War, and it reads like a thriller. You won't be able to put it down. But when you do, send it to your congressman or senator."
    -- Richard Perle, Fellow, American Enterprise Institute, and former Assistant Secretary of Defense.

    "A deeply disturbing account of how America's intelligence agencies failed to discern the elaborate plots of Osama bin Laden's men were planning against us. Exciting. Upsetting. Strongly recommended."
    -- Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, Leavey Professor of Government, Georgetown University, and former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations.

    "Bill Gertz, one of America's most accomplished and credible investigative reporters, offers a compelling analysis of our nation's intelligence problems, including their historical roots, and provides a comprehensive prescription for correcting the deficiencies and improving national security."
    -- Edwin Meese III, former Attorney General of the United States.

    "A great read."
    -- John McLaughlin, host, "One on One"


    Eyes Wide Shut
    Washington Times book review by Joshua Sinai

    'Breakdown': A Catastrophic Failure to Think the Unthinkable
    New York Times book review by Sam Roberts

    Intelligence: A smarter route
    By Edwin J. Feulner


    CNN/Time Poll:
    Did U.S. Intelligence Agencies Fail on 9/11?

    September 2002
    Yes: 65 percent
    No: 31 percent

    September 2001
    Yes: 55 percent
    No: 38 percent

    (Poll conducted August 28-29, 2002 Sampling error: +/-3% pts)



    Available in both hardcover and soft cover edition

    Click here to purchase 'The China Threat: How the People's Republic Targets America'
    at a 30 Percent Discount from Amazon.com

    Buy 'The China Threat'

    Excerpts from 'The China Threat'
    in The Washington Times

    Part I: Beijing's spies gain access to secrets
    Part II: Clinton critic says he was targeted
    Part III: China prepares for war with U.S. over Taiwan

    The New Cold War
    Washington Times book review by Steven Mosher

    Wire stories about 'The China Threat'

    Reviews:

    "There is no Churchill in America today. Where are they to turn then, those patriots in our security services who understand what the fecklessness, stupidity and corruption of the Clinton administration are costing us? It would not be very surprising if they were to seek out a sympathetic journalist, in the slim hope that the American public might take their eyes away from Hollywood and Wall Street long enough to pay attention. If so, their contact of choice would be Bill Gertz, defense reporter for the Washington Times."
    -- John Derbyshire, National Review, Dec. 4, 2000

    "The China Threat is especially strong in piecing together the larger pattern of modernization in the Chinese military and the looming U.S.-China confrontation over Taiwan."
    -- Tom Donnelly, The Weekly Standard, Dec. 4, 2000

    "Sheer fabrication out of ulterior motives, with which we express our strong dissatisfaction. It must be pointed out that there are always some people in the United States who cling to the Cold War mentality and have prejudice of and hostility against China... We demand those who have plotted the so-called 'China Spy Case' see clearly the trend of history and immediately stop their despicable acts of wantonly attacking China."
    -- Sun Yuxi, spokesman for the Foreign Ministry, People's Republic of China, Nov. 16, 2000




    Available in both hardcover and soft cover edition

    Click here to purchase 'Betrayal: How the Clinton Administration Undermined American Security'
    from Amazon.com at a 30 Percent Discount

    Buy 'Betrayal'

    Praise for Betrayal
    "This will be the Clinton administration's least favorite book on its foreign policy. But the rebuttals are likely to be long on adjectives and short on refutation, for these tough charges are backed, the Gertz way, by fact after fact after fact."
    -- R. James Woolsey, former CIA Director

    "Mr. Gertz has performed a signal service by writing this thorough, frightening, and sad chronicle of how we fell from our ability to provide leadership in the quest for peace without appeasement."
    -- The Honorable Caspar Weinberger, former Secretary of Defense, Chairman of Forbes magazine

    "I know of no national security reporter in the U.S. who is better sourced or more respected for accuracy than Bill Gertz. His reporting is essential reading for those who wish to stay in the know. An so is Betrayal."
    -- James Webb, former Secretary of the Navy, author of Fields of Fire and The Emperor's General


    Revised and Updated Softcover Edition

    Buy 'Breakdown'


    Excerpts from
    Breakdown: The Failure of American Intelligence to Defeat Global Terror

    Part 1: Military analyst's terror warning fell on deaf ears

    Part 2: Legal concerns make the CIA 'risk averse'

    Part 3: Too much focus on being cops



    Click Here To Buy a Copy of the hardcover edition of
    'Breakdown: How America's Intelligence Failures Led to September 11'
    at a 30 Percent Discount
    from Amazon.com

    Buy 'Breakdown'

    Praise for Breakdown:

    "Bill Gertz has written a first-rate analysis of the most serious problem to confront the nation since the Cold War, and it reads like a thriller. You won't be able to put it down. But when you do, send it to your congressman or senator."
    -- Richard Perle, Fellow, American Enterprise Institute, and former Assistant Secretary of Defense.

    "A deeply disturbing account of how America's intelligence agencies failed to discern the elaborate plots of Osama bin Laden's men were planning against us. Exciting. Upsetting. Strongly recommended."
    -- Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, Leavey Professor of Government, Georgetown University, and former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations.

    "Bill Gertz, one of America's most accomplished and credible investigative reporters, offers a compelling analysis of our nation's intelligence problems, including their historical roots, and provides a comprehensive prescription for correcting the deficiencies and improving national security."
    -- Edwin Meese III, former Attorney General of the United States.

    "A great read."
    -- John McLaughlin, host, "One on One"


    Eyes Wide Shut
    Washington Times book review by Joshua Sinai

    'Breakdown': A Catastrophic Failure to Think the Unthinkable
    New York Times book review by Sam Roberts

    Intelligence: A smarter route
    By Edwin J. Feulner


    CNN/Time Poll:
    Did U.S. Intelligence Agencies Fail on 9/11?

    September 2002
    Yes: 65 percent
    No: 31 percent

    September 2001
    Yes: 55 percent
    No: 38 percent

    (Poll conducted August 28-29, 2002 Sampling error: +/-3% pts)



    Available in both hardcover and soft cover edition

    Click here to purchase 'The China Threat: How the People's Republic Targets America'
    at a 30 Percent Discount from Amazon.com

    Buy 'The China Threat'

    Excerpts from 'The China Threat'
    in The Washington Times

    Part I: Beijing's spies gain access to secrets
    Part II: Clinton critic says he was targeted
    Part III: China prepares for war with U.S. over Taiwan

    The New Cold War
    Washington Times book review by Steven Mosher

    Wire stories about 'The China Threat'

    Reviews:

    "There is no Churchill in America today. Where are they to turn then, those patriots in our security services who understand what the fecklessness, stupidity and corruption of the Clinton administration are costing us? It would not be very surprising if they were to seek out a sympathetic journalist, in the slim hope that the American public might take their eyes away from Hollywood and Wall Street long enough to pay attention. If so, their contact of choice would be Bill Gertz, defense reporter for the Washington Times."
    -- John Derbyshire, National Review, Dec. 4, 2000

    "The China Threat is especially strong in piecing together the larger pattern of modernization in the Chinese military and the looming U.S.-China confrontation over Taiwan."
    -- Tom Donnelly, The Weekly Standard, Dec. 4, 2000

    "Sheer fabrication out of ulterior motives, with which we express our strong dissatisfaction. It must be pointed out that there are always some people in the United States who cling to the Cold War mentality and have prejudice of and hostility against China... We demand those who have plotted the so-called 'China Spy Case' see clearly the trend of history and immediately stop their despicable acts of wantonly attacking China."
    -- Sun Yuxi, spokesman for the Foreign Ministry, People's Republic of China, Nov. 16, 2000




    Available in both hardcover and soft cover edition

    Click here to purchase 'Betrayal: How the Clinton Administration Undermined American Security'
    from Amazon.com at a 30 Percent Discount

    Buy 'Betrayal'

    Praise for Betrayal
    "This will be the Clinton administration's least favorite book on its foreign policy. But the rebuttals are likely to be long on adjectives and short on refutation, for these tough charges are backed, the Gertz way, by fact after fact after fact."
    -- R. James Woolsey, former CIA Director

    "Mr. Gertz has performed a signal service by writing this thorough, frightening, and sad chronicle of how we fell from our ability to provide leadership in the quest for peace without appeasement."
    -- The Honorable Caspar Weinberger, former Secretary of Defense, Chairman of Forbes magazine

    "I know of no national security reporter in the U.S. who is better sourced or more respected for accuracy than Bill Gertz. His reporting is essential reading for those who wish to stay in the know. An so is Betrayal."
    -- James Webb, former Secretary of the Navy, author of Fields of Fire and The Emperor's General



    Revised and Updated Softcover Edition

    Buy 'Breakdown'


    Excerpts from
    Breakdown: The Failure of American Intelligence to Defeat Global Terror

    Part 1: Military analyst's terror warning fell on deaf ears

    Part 2: Legal concerns make the CIA 'risk averse'

    Part 3: Too much focus on being cops



    Click Here To Buy a Copy of the hardcover edition of
    'Breakdown: How America's Intelligence Failures Led to September 11'
    at a 30 Percent Discount
    from Amazon.com

    Buy 'Breakdown'

    Praise for Breakdown:

    "Bill Gertz has written a first-rate analysis of the most serious problem to confront the nation since the Cold War, and it reads like a thriller. You won't be able to put it down. But when you do, send it to your congressman or senator."
    -- Richard Perle, Fellow, American Enterprise Institute, and former Assistant Secretary of Defense.

    "A deeply disturbing account of how America's intelligence agencies failed to discern the elaborate plots of Osama bin Laden's men were planning against us. Exciting. Upsetting. Strongly recommended."
    -- Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, Leavey Professor of Government, Georgetown University, and former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations.

    "Bill Gertz, one of America's most accomplished and credible investigative reporters, offers a compelling analysis of our nation's intelligence problems, including their historical roots, and provides a comprehensive prescription for correcting the deficiencies and improving national security."
    -- Edwin Meese III, former Attorney General of the United States.

    "A great read."
    -- John McLaughlin, host, "One on One"


    Eyes Wide Shut
    Washington Times book review by Joshua Sinai

    'Breakdown': A Catastrophic Failure to Think the Unthinkable
    New York Times book review by Sam Roberts

    Intelligence: A smarter route
    By Edwin J. Feulner


    CNN/Time Poll:
    Did U.S. Intelligence Agencies Fail on 9/11?

    September 2002
    Yes: 65 percent
    No: 31 percent

    September 2001
    Yes: 55 percent
    No: 38 percent

    (Poll conducted August 28-29, 2002 Sampling error: +/-3% pts)



    Available in both hardcover and soft cover edition

    Click here to purchase 'The China Threat: How the People's Republic Targets America'
    at a 30 Percent Discount from Amazon.com

    Buy 'The China Threat'

    Excerpts from 'The China Threat'
    in The Washington Times

    Part I: Beijing's spies gain access to secrets
    Part II: Clinton critic says he was targeted
    Part III: China prepares for war with U.S. over Taiwan

    The New Cold War
    Washington Times book review by Steven Mosher

    Wire stories about 'The China Threat'

    Reviews:

    "There is no Churchill in America today. Where are they to turn then, those patriots in our security services who understand what the fecklessness, stupidity and corruption of the Clinton administration are costing us? It would not be very surprising if they were to seek out a sympathetic journalist, in the slim hope that the American public might take their eyes away from Hollywood and Wall Street long enough to pay attention. If so, their contact of choice would be Bill Gertz, defense reporter for the Washington Times."
    -- John Derbyshire, National Review, Dec. 4, 2000

    "The China Threat is especially strong in piecing together the larger pattern of modernization in the Chinese military and the looming U.S.-China confrontation over Taiwan."
    -- Tom Donnelly, The Weekly Standard, Dec. 4, 2000

    "Sheer fabrication out of ulterior motives, with which we express our strong dissatisfaction. It must be pointed out that there are always some people in the United States who cling to the Cold War mentality and have prejudice of and hostility against China... We demand those who have plotted the so-called 'China Spy Case' see clearly the trend of history and immediately stop their despicable acts of wantonly attacking China."
    -- Sun Yuxi, spokesman for the Foreign Ministry, People's Republic of China, Nov. 16, 2000




    Available in both hardcover and soft cover edition

    Click here to purchase 'Betrayal: How the Clinton Administration Undermined American Security'
    from Amazon.com at a 30 Percent Discount

    Buy 'Betrayal'

    Praise for Betrayal
    "This will be the Clinton administration's least favorite book on its foreign policy. But the rebuttals are likely to be long on adjectives and short on refutation, for these tough charges are backed, the Gertz way, by fact after fact after fact."
    -- R. James Woolsey, former CIA Director

    "Mr. Gertz has performed a signal service by writing this thorough, frightening, and sad chronicle of how we fell from our ability to provide leadership in the quest for peace without appeasement."
    -- The Honorable Caspar Weinberger, former Secretary of Defense, Chairman of Forbes magazine

    "I know of no national security reporter in the U.S. who is better sourced or more respected for accuracy than Bill Gertz. His reporting is essential reading for those who wish to stay in the know. An so is Betrayal."
    -- James Webb, former Secretary of the Navy, author of Fields of Fire and The Emperor's General



    Revised and Updated Softcover Edition

    Buy 'Breakdown'


    Excerpts from
    Breakdown: The Failure of American Intelligence to Defeat Global Terror

    Part 1: Military analyst's terror warning fell on deaf ears

    Part 2: Legal concerns make the CIA 'risk averse'

    Part 3: Too much focus on being cops



    Click Here To Buy a Copy of the hardcover edition of
    'Breakdown: How America's Intelligence Failures Led to September 11'
    at a 30 Percent Discount
    from Amazon.com

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    Praise for Breakdown:

    "Bill Gertz has written a first-rate analysis of the most serious problem to confront the nation since the Cold War, and it reads like a thriller. You won't be able to put it down. But when you do, send it to your congressman or senator."
    -- Richard Perle, Fellow, American Enterprise Institute, and former Assistant Secretary of Defense.

    "A deeply disturbing account of how America's intelligence agencies failed to discern the elaborate plots of Osama bin Laden's men were planning against us. Exciting. Upsetting. Strongly recommended."
    -- Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, Leavey Professor of Government, Georgetown University, and former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations.

    "Bill Gertz, one of America's most accomplished and credible investigative reporters, offers a compelling analysis of our nation's intelligence problems, including their historical roots, and provides a comprehensive prescription for correcting the deficiencies and improving national security."
    -- Edwin Meese III, former Attorney General of the United States.

    "A great read."
    -- John McLaughlin, host, "One on One"


    Eyes Wide Shut
    Washington Times book review by Joshua Sinai

    'Breakdown': A Catastrophic Failure to Think the Unthinkable
    New York Times book review by Sam Roberts

    Intelligence: A smarter route
    By Edwin J. Feulner


    CNN/Time Poll:
    Did U.S. Intelligence Agencies Fail on 9/11?

    September 2002
    Yes: 65 percent
    No: 31 percent

    September 2001
    Yes: 55 percent
    No: 38 percent

    (Poll conducted August 28-29, 2002 Sampling error: +/-3% pts)



    Available in both hardcover and soft cover edition

    Click here to purchase 'The China Threat: How the People's Republic Targets America'
    at a 30 Percent Discount from Amazon.com

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    Excerpts from 'The China Threat'
    in The Washington Times

    Part I: Beijing's spies gain access to secrets
    Part II: Clinton critic says he was targeted
    Part III: China prepares for war with U.S. over Taiwan

    The New Cold War
    Washington Times book review by Steven Mosher

    Wire stories about 'The China Threat'

    Reviews:

    "There is no Churchill in America today. Where are they to turn then, those patriots in our security services who understand what the fecklessness, stupidity and corruption of the Clinton administration are costing us? It would not be very surprising if they were to seek out a sympathetic journalist, in the slim hope that the American public might take their eyes away from Hollywood and Wall Street long enough to pay attention. If so, their contact of choice would be Bill Gertz, defense reporter for the Washington Times."
    -- John Derbyshire, National Review, Dec. 4, 2000

    "The China Threat is especially strong in piecing together the larger pattern of modernization in the Chinese military and the looming U.S.-China confrontation over Taiwan."
    -- Tom Donnelly, The Weekly Standard, Dec. 4, 2000

    "Sheer fabrication out of ulterior motives, with which we express our strong dissatisfaction. It must be pointed out that there are always some people in the United States who cling to the Cold War mentality and have prejudice of and hostility against China... We demand those who have plotted the so-called 'China Spy Case' see clearly the trend of history and immediately stop their despicable acts of wantonly attacking China."
    -- Sun Yuxi, spokesman for the Foreign Ministry, People's Republic of China, Nov. 16, 2000




    Available in both hardcover and soft cover edition

    Click here to purchase 'Betrayal: How the Clinton Administration Undermined American Security'
    from Amazon.com at a 30 Percent Discount

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    Praise for Betrayal
    "This will be the Clinton administration's least favorite book on its foreign policy. But the rebuttals are likely to be long on adjectives and short on refutation, for these tough charges are backed, the Gertz way, by fact after fact after fact."
    -- R. James Woolsey, former CIA Director

    "Mr. Gertz has performed a signal service by writing this thorough, frightening, and sad chronicle of how we fell from our ability to provide leadership in the quest for peace without appeasement."
    -- The Honorable Caspar Weinberger, former Secretary of Defense, Chairman of Forbes magazine

    "I know of no national security reporter in the U.S. who is better sourced or more respected for accuracy than Bill Gertz. His reporting is essential reading for those who wish to stay in the know. An so is Betrayal."
    -- James Webb, former Secretary of the Navy, author of Fields of Fire and The Emperor's General



  • Contact Bill Gertz at 202-636-3000